FictionFan Awards 2014 – Crime/Thriller Category – Books in a Series

Drum roll please…

 

…for this year’s nominees and winners of the annual FictionFan Awards of 2014 in the Crime Fiction/Thriller Category – Books in a Series.

If you’ve been around the last couple of weeks, you might want to skip this bit and go straight to the awards. But for the benefit of new readers, a quick reminder of the rules…

THE CRITERIA

All nominees must be books I’ve read and reviewed between November 2013 and October 2014 regardless of publication date, but excluding re-reads. The books must have received a 5-star rating.

THE CATEGORIES

There will be Honourable Mentions and a Winner in each of the following categories

Factual – click to see awards

Genre Fiction – click to see awards

Literary Fiction – click to see awards

Crime Fiction/Thrillers – Books in a Series

Crime Fiction/Thrillers – Standalone Novels

 

…and…

Book of the Year 2014

THE PRIZES

For the winners!

I guarantee to read the authors’ next book even if I have to buy it myself!

For the runners-up!

Nothing!

THE JUDGES

Me!

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So, without further ado, here are this year’s runners-up and winner in

 

CRIME FICTION/THRILLERS

 

As usual, there are far more books in contention for this category, and many of them are installments in series that I follow. So, since I found it almost impossible to narrow the entries down, I’ve decided to have two sub-categories of nominees, Series and Standalones, each with a winner, and to split them over today and tomorrow. Here goes then…

BOOKS IN A SERIES

HONOURABLE MENTIONS

 

the killThe Kill (from the Maeve Kerrigan series) by Jane Casey

When an off-duty policeman is shot dead in his car it looks at first as though the motive must be something to do with his personal life. His widow seems angry rather than grief-stricken and his daughter has some unexplained bruises. But a few days later a team of officers is attacked while out on patrol and it becomes clear that someone is targeting the police in general. But no-one knows why…or do they? This is the fifth book in the Maeve Kerrigan series and continues the high standard that Jane Casey has set herself in the last couple.

Click to see the full review

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Saints of the Shadow Bible (from the Rebus series) by Ian Rankin

saints of the shadow bibleWhen the ‘double jeopardy’ law is relaxed, the Solicitor General asks Malcolm Fox to reinvestigate a case from the ’80s, one involving a young DC Rebus. Meantime, in the present day, Siobhan Clarke and Rebus are back working as a team. With the new rules on retirement age, Rebus has been taken back into CID but has had to take a downgrading to Detective Sergeant, meaning Siobhan now outranks him. They are called out to what looks at first like a straightforward road accident, but a couple of things about the scene make them suspect there may be more to it than that. A fine entry in the series that, as always, has great characterisation, a complex plot and a real insight into modern Scottish life.

Click to see the full review

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the papers of tony veitchThe Papers of Tony Veitch (from the Laidlaw series) by William McIlvanney

Tony Veitch has disappeared and it seems like half the city is looking for him. Laidlaw’s one of the searchers. He knows why he’s looking for Tony – his name’s come up in connection with Eck Adamson, a drunk and down-and-out, now dead; and it seems Laidlaw’s the only man who cares. But Laidlaw doesn’t know why some of Glasgow’s hardest men seem to be wanting to find Veitch too, and the question is – who’ll find him first? Glasgow, as the sum of its people good and bad, is the character that is at the heart of the book and McIlvanney makes us weep and rejoice for it in equal measure. A love letter from a man who sees the violence and darkness of the city, but also sees it as a place of courage and heart and humour – and ultimately integrity. A great book.

Click to see the full review

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A Dark and Twisted Tide (from the Lacey Flint series) by Sharon Bolton

a dark and twisted tideAfter her recent experiences, Lacey has stepped back from her role as a detective and joined the Met’s Marine Unit, patrolling the Thames. She’s also moved to live on a houseboat moored in Deptford Creek and taken up the highly dangerous sport of river-swimming. And it’s when she’s out swimming alone one early morning that she finds the first body…

This is another excellent entry in the Lacey Flint series, with all the regulars back in fine form. By a tiny margin, not the best in the series perhaps, but still one of the best books I’ve read or expect to read this year.

Click to see the full review

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FICTIONFAN AWARD WINNER 2014

for

BEST CRIME FICTION/THRILLER BOOK IN A SERIES

 

gallowglass

Gallowglass (from the Douglas Brodie series) by Gordon Ferris

Post-WW2 Glasgow. Douglas Brodie is back working at the newspaper and beginning to recover from the psychological after-effects of his recent involvement in the Nazi war-crime trials. But he still hasn’t learned how to avoid danger. So when Lady Gibson asks him for help, he finds himself unable to turn her down. Her husband, Sir Fraser Gibson, the Chairman of the Scottish Linen Bank, has been kidnapped, and Lady Gibson has decided to pay the ransom without involving the police. So Brodie sets off with a briefcase full of cash to make the rendezvous on her behalf. Needless to say, it doesn’t go according to plan..

This is the fourth and, I believe, final entry in the Douglas Brodie series, and the award is as much for the whole series as for this individual book. Now that we have all four books, we can see how Brodie’s character has changed in the few years since the end of the war – at first an all-action man, careless to a degree of his own life and others; then having to face the source of his nightmares and realise the damage that he’d suffered in the war – and finally, in this excellent last instalment, asking himself whether he can find some kind of peace and redemption, and have a future worth living. Although each works as a standalone, I would strongly suggest reading them in order to see the skilful way that Ferris develops Brodie’s character throughout. A great series, where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. And a very worthy winner.

Click to see the full review

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Tomorrow: The Standalone Award and Book of the Year 2014

A Dark and Twisted Tide (Lacey Flint 4) by Sharon Bolton

a dark and twisted tide“Till human voices wake us, and we drown…”

😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

After her recent experiences, Lacey has stepped back from her role as a detective and joined the Met’s Marine Unit, patrolling the Thames. She’s also moved to live on a houseboat moored in Deptford Creek and taken up the highly dangerous sport of river-swimming. And it’s when she’s out swimming alone one early morning that she finds the first body…

This is another excellent entry in the Lacey Flint series, with all the regulars back in fine form. Mark Joesbury (sigh!) is off on an undercover mission but we know he won’t be able to stay away from Lacey for long. Dana’s long-distance relationship with Helen is still continuing, and Dana is becoming desperate to have a child. And Lacey, although still suffering the after-effects of her last couple of cases, is continuing to move towards a more normal existence – she’s just about ready to finally accept that there may be a life for her with Mark.

SJ Bolton (source: sjbolton.com)
Sharon Bolton
(source: sjbolton.com)

I’d suggest that, although at a push this book could work as a standalone, it would be much better to read the series in order starting with Now You See Me. The crime story works fine on its own, but the characters develop and grow so much throughout these books that a new reader coming in in the middle might be left a bit puzzled as to the dynamics amongst the members of the team.

Normally Bolton’s plotting is one of her major strengths but, to be honest, I didn’t think the plot of this one was quite up to her usual standard. It relied a bit too much on coincidence and stretched credulity a little too often; and, more than that, I felt the main points of the solution were too easy to work out fairly early on. I also found myself questioning how often we can believe that a killer will specifically target Lacey. However, one of Bolton’s slightly less good plots is still about twenty times better than most people’s best, and what it perhaps lacked in tension was made up for by the brilliant descriptions of the Thames and the people who live and work on it. There are some of Bolton’s trademark creepy moments that set my spine nicely a-tingle – I was never a huge fan of crabs but oooh! Well! They may figure in my nightmares for a while now… 😯

Aaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrgggggh!!!!
Aaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrgggggh!!!!

The story is hard-hitting but as always Bolton manages to tell it without gratuitously-described violence or excessive foul language; and, though the murder victims are young women, Bolton is far too talented and original to rely on tedious scenes of sexual humiliation and torture to harrow her reader’s soul. Lacey is a bit of a maverick, but thankfully not a drunken one, and more and more we see her trying to conform to rules and procedures. One of the most enjoyable aspects of this series has been watching Lacey’s gradual transformation from weird loner to valued team-member – she’s not completely there yet, but she’s getting close. And the fact that she’s changed so much and yet remained completely credible is a testament to Bolton’s skill in characterisation.

By a tiny margin, not the best in the series perhaps, but still one of the best books I’ve read or expect to read this year – highly recommended.

NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Random House Transworld.

Amazon UK Link
Amazon US Link

TBR Thursday 24…

Episode 24 – The People’s Choice 2 – The Result!

 

Now I mean this in the most complimentary way, but…you folks are really quite weird! Of all the books in last week’s poll, I would never have expected the runaway winner, with 40% of all votes cast, to be…

the phantom tollbooth

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

However, I’m delighted with your choice and will be reading and reviewing the book in the near(ish) future. Thanks to everyone who voted – I hope you enjoy these occasional polls as much as I do.

Thanks again to Vishy for his review of this book!

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I’m also delighted to say that the TBR has dipped to 94 (well, 95 once I add The Phantom Tollbooth…actually 96, since the runner-up The Jewel in the Crown seems to have slipped on there too when I wasn’t looking). In line with my policy of iron self-control (which you can see is really working well), I’m adding nothing (else) this week, so here are a few of the ones that are getting close to the top of the list…

Coming soon…

 

a dark and twisted tideCourtesy of NetGalley – the next instalment of one of my favourite series. Interesting to see that SJ Bolton has decided to start using her full name – she explains why on her blog.

The BlurbYoung policewoman Lacey Flint knows that the Thames is a dangerous place – after all, she lives on it and works on it – but she’s always been lucky. Until one day, when she finds a body floating in the water. Who was this woman and why was she wrapped so carefully in white burial cloths before being hidden in the fast-flowing depths? DCI Dana Tulloch hates to admit it, but she’s fond of the mysterious Lacey. Even if she keeps on interfering in her investigations, and is meddling with the latest floater case. But now she’s got to break some terrible news to her – news that could destroy Lacey’s fragile state of mind. And Lacey will need to keep her wits about her because there’s a killer that’s lurking around her boat, leaving her gifts she’d rather not receive . . .

*******

the dead of winterThis has been on my wishlist (the hundred or so books that I like to pretend are not part of the TBR) since it was published in 2009. It has now become urgent since the next book in the series is due out this summer. Thank goodness for the occasional incredibly unprolific author!

The Blurb – The murder of a young Polish girl in wartime London puts John Madden on the trail of a ruthless hired killer. On a freezing London night in 1944, Rosa Novak is brutally murdered during a blackout. The police suspect she was the victim of a random act of violence and might have dropped the case if former police investigator John Madden hadn’t been the victim’s employer. Madden’s old colleagues at Scotland Yard are working on it, but their scant clues lead them to Europe, where the ravages of the war halt their inquiries. Madden feels he owes it to Rosa to find her killer and pushes the investigation until he stumbles upon the dead girl’s connection to a murdered Parisian furrier, a member of the Resistance, and a stolen cache of diamonds.
With rich psychological insights and vivid historical details, this riveting third novel in the Madden series promises to expand Airth’s readership among discerning fans of crime fiction.

*******

a fine balanceSanta brought me this one so it’s long past time it reached the top of the pile. Another massive brick but I have very high hopes of this one…

The Blurb – With a compassionate realism and narrative sweep that recall the work of Charles Dickens, this magnificent novel captures all the cruelty and corruption, dignity and heroism, of India. The time is 1975. The place is an unnamed city by the sea. The government has just declared a State of Emergency, in whose upheavals four strangers–a spirited widow, a young student uprooted from his idyllic hill station, and two tailors who have fled the caste violence of their native village–will be thrust together, forced to share one cramped apartment and an uncertain future.

As the characters move from distrust to friendship and from friendship to love, A Fine Balance creates an enduring panorama of the human spirit in an inhuman state.

*******

NB All blurbs are taken from Goodreads.

So what do you think? Have you read any of these or do you intend to?