The Cask by Freeman Wills Crofts

Enough to drive a girl to drink…

🤬

The CaskAs a cargo ship is unloading at the docks in London, an accident causes a cask to fall and split. Two employees of the shipping company spot that some gold coins have fallen from it so not unnaturally they decide to have a little poke around inside to see if there are more. There are, but more shockingly there is also a dead hand which appears to be attached to an equally dead woman! So begins this ridiculously over-complicated, utterly tedious investigation into the death of someone I didn’t care about at the hands of one of the tiny group of suspects about whom I cared even less. If only the cask had been full of red wine, I could have got paralytically drunk and been happy…

Dear me, that’s the nearest I’ve come to death by boredom in a while! I’ve read a few of Crofts’ extremely procedural procedurals now, with varying degrees of enthusiasm or lack thereof, but this one is in a class of its own. Pages and pages and pages of shipping routes of casks, three detectives going over and over and over the same pieces of evidence again and again and again, zero characterisation of victims, suspects or detectives – truly it is a mystery to me how anyone manages to make it all the way through to the end of this with their sanity intact. I gave up at 53% when it became clear to me that I would soon be screaming out loud rather than just inside my head. I was “interested” enough to flick to the last chapter to find out which of the suspects had done the deed, and when I got there I realised I’d been right along – I really didn’t care!

Murder Mystery Mayhem Logo 2Challenge details:
Book:
16
Subject Heading: The Birth of the Golden Age
Publication Year: 1920

And since I’m moaning, let me have a brief rant about the dialogue. People do not speak as if they are a business letter. No one – NO ONE – ever – in the history of the universe – has ever said in conversation, and I quote:

“That cask, as you see, was invoiced out via Havre and Southampton on the 30th ultimo, and yet it turned up in London on Monday, the 5th instant,…”

Good grief! And then there’s the convoluted journey of the corpse-containing cask, which turns up in Paris, London, Southampton, Le Havre and Rouen, some of them several times. Why? WHY?? Why would a murderer go to these ridiculous lengths to get rid of a body? What’s wrong with burying it in the woods or, since it crosses the Channel at least three times as far as I could gather, dumping it in the sea? And I don’t wish to lower the tone, but would a corpse travelling about in a cask for days in the height of summer remain… ahem… fresh??

(I realise the answers to the above may be given in the 47% of the book I didn’t read, but despite my mouth-frothing ranting, I DON’T CARE!!)

icrofts001p1
Freeman Wills Croft

This was apparently Crofts’ first book, so a very strong argument against reading books in order. He undoubtedly did improve, even if his later books occasionally also bore me into fits of the screaming abdabs. At least he got over the desire to make his characters talk as if they were dictating letters to their secretaries. Apparently writer and critic Julian Symons classed him as one of “the humdrum school” of mystery novelists – on the basis of this one I feel Symons was being too kind. But Martin Edwards is even kinder when he uses the euphemism “meticulous” to describe the endless mind-numbing tediosity of repeated details. Amazingly the book has sold over 100,000 copies. I downloaded my copy free and yet still feel I’ve been overcharged…

If you’ve been having too interesting a time recently and feel the desire to be bored rigid for a change, you too can read this – it’s available here. But get your own cask of medicinal wine first – I’ll need all of mine…

Inspector French: Sudden Death by Freeman Wills Crofts

More how than why…

😀 😀 😀 🙂

Anne Day is delighted to be offered the job of housekeeper at Frayle, the home of the Grinsmead family. However, she soon discovers there are tensions in the household. Mrs Grinsmead seems mistrustful and suspicious of everyone. At first, Anne puts this down to a persecution complex but gradually she begins to wonder if perhaps Mrs Grinsmead has some cause for her worries. But Anne’s still not prepared for the tragedy that will soon strike. Enter Inspector French of Scotland Yard!

It’s a fairly small group of suspects who might have committed the crime – if crime, indeed, there were. (I’ve not said what happened because quite a big proportion of the book happens before the actual crime, and a lot of the suspense in the book is in wondering who the victim will be.) There are Mr and Mrs Grinsmead – she nervy and paranoid, as I’ve said, he attractive and superficially quite kind but really rather cold and selfish. Anne herself is something of an innocent, willing to accept people at face value but with an occasional flash of insight. Anne feels sorry for Mrs Grinsmead and soon becomes her confidante. Then there’s Edith Cheame, the governess of the couple’s little children, who, Anne soon realises, has very little concern for anyone but herself. The cook, the maid and the chauffeur round out what seems like a huge staff for a country solicitor, but of course they’re not important enough to play any role other than as witnesses. There are also various friends and neighbours who play their part, as well as old Mrs Grinsmead, Mr Grinsmead’s mother. (Lots of Grinsmeads and my spellchecker hates them all… 😉 )

Freeman Wills Croft

This novel contains not one but two locked room mysteries – one that is way too fiendish and technical for my poor mind to have had any hope of solving, and the other which seemed to me to be rather blindingly obvious; so much so, that I felt I must be missing something since I almost never work out how locked room mysteries are done. The perspective alternates between Anne and Inspector French, although all told in the third person. I enjoyed the Anne bits very much, since it’s through her we learn about all the various residents in the house and their possible motives. The French bits didn’t work so well for me, as they involve him painstakingly going over and over the technicalities of how the locked room bits were worked. That’s a subjective complaint, though – I’m always more interested in the why than the how in crime fiction. For people who enjoy the puzzle aspect of impossible crimes, I’m sure this would work much better. However, despite that, the book held my attention and, although I had my suspicions from about halfway through which eventually turned out to be right, I was unsure enough about it to still be in suspense until all was revealed. I must say I don’t think French covered himself in glory in this one, though – he seemed to take an awful long time to get there.

This is my second Inspector French novel and I enjoyed the other one considerably more. This is just as well written, but I simply didn’t find the story as interesting. I’m still keen to read others in the series though, and meantime recommend this one to the puzzle-solving enthusiasts out there.

NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Collins Crime Club.

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Inspector French and the Mystery on Southampton Water by Freeman Wills Crofts

Profit motive…

😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Joymount Cement Company is in trouble. Its main local competitor, Chayle’s, has found a new formula that allows them to produce cement more cheaply, thus undercutting Joymount. Joymount’s board of directors decide to give their chief chemist a few weeks to try to replicate the formula – if he fails, then the company may have to close. King, the chemist, tries his best but, as the deadline approaches, he is no nearer finding the solution, so he persuades one of the other directors, Brand, to sneak into Chayle’s with him one night to see what they can find out. That’s when things begin to go horribly wrong…

This is an “inverted” mystery, a format for which I understand Crofts was particularly well known. (For the uninitiated, this means that the crime is shown first including the identity of the criminal, and then the story joins the detective, showing the methods he uses to investigate it.) The story leading up to the break-in at Chayle’s and the resulting death that happens there is very well told, but only takes up about a quarter of the book. Inspector French from Scotland Yard is brought in because the local police suspect that there’s more to the break-in and death at Chayle’s than meets the eye. French soon confirms this, and now a murder hunt is on.

At this point, I was thinking that it was going to be a long haul watching French discover what we, the readers, already knew had happened. I should have had more faith in Crofts’ reputation! I can only be vague because I want to avoid even the smallest of spoilers, but suddenly another event happens that turns the story on its head, leading to another crime – one to which the reader does not know the solution. This second crime forms the main focus of the book, and a very satisfying mystery it is. The possible suspect list is tiny, but the clues are so beautifully meted out that I changed my mind several times about whodunit, and only got about halfway there in the end. It’s also a howdunit – until the method is discovered, it’s almost impossible to know who would have had the opportunity to commit the crime. So in the end, Crofts throws in everything – an inverted crime, a traditional mystery, alibis, method, motives, all wrapped up in a police procedural, and it all works brilliantly.

Freeman Wills Crofts

He also does a lovely job with the characterisation – not so much of French, who truthfully is a bit bland as detectives go, in this one at any rate, but of the men involved – King, Brand, their boss Tasker, and their opposite numbers at Chayle’s. They are each given clear motivation for how they act individually, and there’s a good deal of moral ambiguity floating around – while not everyone is guilty in the eyes of the law, very few could be called entirely innocent. The murkiness of the business world is at the heart of the story, and the lengths to which men will go in the pursuit of profit. (Yes, they’re all men – it was first published in 1934.)

I loved this. So intricately plotted but also with a very human set of characters to stop it from being merely a puzzle. It’s only the second book of Crofts I’ve read, the other being The 12:30 from Croydon, which I also thoroughly enjoyed. It too is an inverted mystery, but very different in how it’s done, showing that this particular sub-genre has more room for variety than I’d have expected. I will now add Crofts to my ever-growing list of vintage crime writers to be further explored! Happily I have another couple of his books already waiting on the TBR pile…

NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, HarperCollins.

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The 12:30 from Croydon by Freeman Wills Crofts

Through the eyes of a killer…

😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

the-12-30-from-croydonIt’s 10-year-old Rose Morley’s first trip on an aeroplane so she’s excited, despite the fact that the reason for the trip is to go to Paris where her mother has had an accident and is in hospital. With her are her father, Peter, and her elderly and rather ill grandfather, Andrew Crowther, whose manservant and general carer Weatherup is with him too. Before they take off, they get a telegram to say Rose’s mother will be fine after all, so they can enjoy the journey with no fear. But when they arrive in Paris, it turns out that grandfather Andrew is not sleeping as they had all thought – he’s dead. And it’s soon discovered that he’s been murdered.

This is an interesting take on the crime novel, and innovative for its time. We may have seen crimes from the perspective of the murderer fairly often now, but apparently this was one of the first when it was published in 1934. Following the rather brilliantly described flight to Paris, at a time when planes were still held together by little more than chewing-gum and prayer, the book flashes back a few weeks in time and we meet Charles Swinburn, nephew of the murdered man. It’s from Charles’ perspective that the story unfolds from there on.

Charles had inherited his uncle’s successful manufacturing business but the depression of the 1930s has brought him near bankruptcy. Unfortunately, he’s also fallen hopelessly in love with the beautiful but mercenary Una, who makes no secret of the fact that she will only marry a rich man. So when his attempts to raise a loan meet with failure, Charles begins to imagine how convenient it would be if his rich uncle would die so that Charles can get his hands on the inheritance he’s been promised. The reader then follows along as Charles decides to turn this dream into reality.

I found the first section of the book fairly slow. Crofts describes Charles’ business difficulties in great and convincing detail, with much talk of profit margins and wage bills and so on. It’s actually quite fascinating, giving a very real picture of a struggling business in a harsh economic climate, but since I spent a goodly proportion of my life working in business finance, it all began to feel like I was reading financial reports, and I found myself inadvertently formulating business plans in my head to save the company. I’m sure it wouldn’t have that effect on normal people though… 😉

"Hengist" flying over Croydon airfield - the very plane in which Rose flew to Paris...
“Hengist” flying over Croydon airfield – the very plane in which Rose flew to Paris…

However, once Charles decides to do the deed, I became totally hooked. It carries that same level of detail over into the planning of the crime, and I should warn you all that I now know lots of incredibly useful stuff should I ever decide someone needs to be murdered – just sayin’. In the planning stage, it’s almost an intellectual exercise for Charles and he goes about it quite coldly. But in the aftermath of the crime, we see the effect it has on him – not guilt, exactly, but a kind of creeping horror at the thought of what he’s done. And when Inspector French arrives on the scene to investigate, we see Charles swaying between confidence that he’s pulled off the perfect crime, and terror that he may have missed some detail that will give him away. I won’t give any more away, but there are a couple of complications along the way that ratchet up the tension and the horror.

There’s a final short section, an afterword almost, when we see the investigation from Inspector French’s perspective. To be honest, this bit felt redundant to me – I felt it would have been more effective had it finished before that part. I suspect it may only have been added because French was Crofts’ recurring detective, and perhaps Crofts thought existing fans would have felt short-changed if his part in the story didn’t get told.

Freeman Wills Croft
Freeman Wills Croft

So, a slow start and an unnecessary section at the end, but the bulk of the book – the planning, the crime itself, and the investigation as seen through Charles’ eyes – is excellent. I like Crofts’ writing style – it’s quite plain and straightforward, but the quality of the plotting still enables him to make this a tense read. The question obviously is not who did the crime, but will he be caught? And, like Charles, I found myself desperately trying to see if he’d left any loopholes. In fact, it was a bit worrying how well Crofts managed to put me inside Charles’ head – I wouldn’t say I was on his side, exactly, but I was undoubtedly more ambivalent than I should have been. The format leads to some duplication as we see the same events from different angles and perspectives, but this was a small weakness in what I otherwise thought was a very well crafted and original novel. Highly recommended – another winner from the British Library Crime Classics series. Keep ’em coming!

NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Poisoned Pen Press.

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Inspector French and the Crime at Guildford by Freeman Wills Croft

Robbery and murder…

😀 😀 😀 🙂

Renowned jewellery company, Nornes Ltd., is in trouble. The long recession has driven them into losses and now that it’s over business isn’t picking up as much as they’d hoped. The directors have to make a decision quickly – to raise extra cash to allow them to struggle on in the hopes of better times ahead, or to go into voluntary liquidation, sell off their stock, and each take a financial hit. They decide to hold a secret meeting at the home of the managing director in Guildford to discuss matters, and invite the company’s accountant along to give them his advice. But things are about to get worse. First the accountant is found dead – murdered – the morning after he arrives, and then they discover that somehow the company’s safe has been emptied of half a million pounds’ worth of jewels. Chief Inspector French is in charge of the investigation into the theft, and must work with his colleagues in Guildford to see if the two events are linked, as seems likely…

As with the other Crofts novels I’ve read, this is as much howdunit as whodunit, with two separate mysteries to solve. Firstly, how could the accountant have been murdered when it appears no one could have gone to his room without being seen around the time of death determined by the doctor? And secondly, how could anyone have been able to bypass the strict security measures surrounding the keys to the safe in order to steal the jewels? French feels that he has to answer these questions before he has any hope of discovering who did the crimes.

These books are extremely procedural police procedurals, probably more true to life than most crime novels. Unfortunately I find that tends to make them a bit plodding. French goes over the same questions again and again, worrying away at tiny bits of evidence, painstakingly checking statements and alibis, following trails that lead nowhere, until eventually he has a moment of inspiration that puts him on the right track, and from thereon it becomes a matter of finding sufficient evidence to prove his theory in court.

In two of the three French books I’ve read so far, I’ve also had the unusual experience for me of working out at least part of the howdunit long before French gets there, a thing I’m usually rubbish at, which suggests to me they must be relatively obvious. In this one, I had spotted how the murder must have been done by about the halfway mark, although I’d never in a million years have worked out how the robbery was carried out. As French suspected would happen, though, working out how the murder was done pointed directly at the villain, so I also had a good idea of whodunit from early on too. So I spent a good deal of the book waiting for French to catch up. All of this rather made the long middle part of the book drag for me.

Freeman Wills Croft

However, the beginning is interesting as we meet the various suspects and learn about the company’s difficulties. The solution to the safe robbery is ingenious and certainly something I’ve never come across before. And the end takes on mild aspects of the thriller as French and his colleagues try to trap their suspects into giving themselves away. Again it’s done strictly realistically, showing how the police would actually operate. This is interesting and gives the book credibility, but I must admit it doesn’t make for heart-pounding excitement.

I think it’s probably a subjective taste thing – I can see how this detailed investigative technique could work well for the puzzle-solvers among us, but for me there wasn’t enough concentration on the characterisation, while the motive – straightforward robbery for financial gain – is never one that interests me much. So a middling read for me, but one that will doubtless be more appreciated by true howdunit fans.

NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Collins Crime Club.

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TBR Thursday 290 and Quarterly Round-Up

TBR Quarterly Report

At the New Year, as I do every year, I set myself some targets for my various reading challenges and for the reduction of my ever-expanding TBR. I still seem to be storming through the books this year, which ought to mean I’ll be smashing all my targets. Ought to…

Here goes, then – the second check-in of the year…

TBR Quarterly Jun 2021

Well, I don’t think I’ve ever been on track with so many targets at this point of the year – it can’t last! Poor old Reginald Hill is falling behind – must make more effort. I should be able to catch up with the Classics Club and finish by my extended deadline of the end of the year – only a couple of chunksters left and all the rest should be fairly quick reads. The shortfall in new releases has reduced considerably this quarter and (theoretically) will be smashed by the time I’ve read all the review books on my 20 Books of Summer list. The fact that I’m abandoning lots of new fiction isn’t helping, though! The TBR Reduction is awful – I can’t see me meeting those targets without magical intervention. But hey! Who’s counting? 😉

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The Classics Club

I read three from my Classics Club list this quarter but have only reviewed two so far, and had another still to review from the previous quarter…

76. Way Station by Clifford D Simak – I loved this well written, thought-provoking science fiction novel, with shades of Cold War nuclear fear, lots of imaginative aliens and a kind of mystical, New Age-y touch. 5 stars.

77. The Conjure-Man Dies by Rudolph Fisher – This, the first mystery novel written by a black American and with an exclusively black cast of characters, delighted me with its vivid, joyous picture of life in Harlem. Lots of humour and a great plot. 5 stars.

78. The Silver Darlings by Neil M Gunn – A slow-going but interesting look at the beginnings of the Scottish herring industry, following on from the devastation of the Highland Clearances. I enjoyed this one, not least because several of my blog buddies read it with me. 4 stars.

Not good on the quantity, perhaps, but high on quality!

78 down, 12 to go!

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Murder Mystery Mayhem

Managing to keep on track with this challenge at the moment more or less – I’ve read three this quarter, but only reviewed two of them so far. However I had one left over to review from the previous quarter…

43. The Sussex Downs Murder by John Bude – One in Bude’s long-running Inspector Meredith series, I find these a little too painstakingly procedural for my taste, although the plot and setting of this one are good. 3½ stars.

44. The Cask by Freeman Wills Crofts – Talking of too procedural, I abandoned this one halfway through on the grounds of being determined not to die of boredom! Crofts’ first, and the best I can say about it is he improved in later books. 1 generous star.

45. The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey – Great writing and a perfectly delivered plot mean that this one’s reputation as a classic of the genre is fully deserved. More psychological than procedural, and with a wonderful depiction of an early version of “trial by media”. 5 stars

45 down, 57 to go!

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Reading the Spanish Civil War Challenge

I only read two for this challenge this quarter but in my defence one of them was a massive biography of Franco, which I haven’t yet reviewed. However I had one left to review from last quarter…

5. In Diamond Square by Mercè Rodoreda. The story of young wife and mother, Natalia, living in Barcelona while her husband is off fighting in the war. It’s a fascinating picture of someone who has no interest in or understanding of politics – who simply endures as other people destroy her world then put it back together in a different form. Packed full of power and emotion – a deserved classic. 4½ stars.

6. Last Days in Cleaver Square by Patrick McGrath. As Franco lies on his deathbed in Spain, Francis McNulty is convinced the dictator is haunting him, and his memories of his time in Spain as a volunteer medic on the Republican side and the horrors he witnessed there are brought back afresh to his mind. Beautifully written, entertaining, moving, full of emotional truth. 5 stars.

Two short books, two different squares, and two great reads, so hurrah for this challenge!

6 down, indefinite number to go!

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The People’s Choice

People's Choice Logo

Unbelievably I’m still up-to-date with this challenge, so three reviews for this quarter plus one that was left over from the previous quarter. Did You, The People, pick me some good ones…?

MarchThe Crow Trap by Ann Cleeves – The first of the Vera Stanhope series – the underlying plot is good and Vera is an interesting, if unbelievable, character. But oh dear, the book is massively over-padded and repetitive, and I found it a real struggle to wade through. 3 stars.

AprilCold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons – A parody of the rural rustic novel popular at the time, there’s a lot of humour in it with some very funny scenes, and it’s especially fun to try to spot which authors and books Gibbons had in mind. It outstayed its welcome just a little as the joke began to wear rather thin, but overall an entertaining read. 4 stars.

MayThe Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith – The first of the Cormoran Strike novels sees him investigating the death of a supermodel, with the help of his temporary secretary, Robin. I’m feeling repetitive myself now, but this is another with a good plot buried under far too much extraneous padding. Galbraith’s easy writing style carried me through, however. 4 stars.

June – Sweet Caress by William Boyd – In the early days of the twentieth century, young Amory Clay decides to become a professional photographer, and her elderly self looks back at where her career took her. Sadly this one didn’t work for me at all and I eventually abandoned it. 1 star.

Even if there were no five stars, there was only one complete dud, so I think you did pretty well, People! And they’re all off my TBR at last – hurrah!

6 down, 6 to go!

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Wanderlust Bingo

Wanderlust Bingo June 2021

I’ve done a little better this quarter and have also started looking ahead to try to make sure I have something for each box. I might shuffle them all around at the end so this is all quite tentative at this stage. The dark blue ones are from last quarter, and the orange ones are this quarter’s. (If you click on the bingo card you should get a larger version.)

EnglandThe Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey – 5 stars. I’ve slotted this into Small Town at the moment, since the setting plays an important part in the plot.

IcelandThe Chill Factor by Richard Falkirk – 4 stars. Another that could work for Small Town, or Europe, but I’ve slotted it into Island at present.

MalayaA Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute – 5 stars. Could be Australia as well, so Oceania, but I’ve gone with the Malayan section and put it into Walk.

AustraliaThe Survivors by Jane Harper – 4 stars. Another that would work for Oceania, but since the Beach plays a major part in the story that’s where I’ve put it.

ScotlandThe Silver Darlings by Neil M Gunn – 4 stars. Since this is all about herring fishing, I don’t imagine I’ll find a better fit for the Sea box.

Still a long, long way to travel, but there are some interesting reads coming up for this one…

7 down, 18 to go!

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Whew! Apologies for the length of this post, but I guess that indicates a successful quarter. Thanks as always for sharing my reading experiences!

Here’s to more great reading next quarter! 😀

The Sussex Downs Murder by John Bude

Missing, presumed dead…

😀 😀 😀 🙂

The Sussex Downs MurderBrothers John and William Rothers share the family home and lime manufacturing business at Chalklands Farm in Sussex. William’s wife also lives there, which is unfortunate, or convenient, depending on your viewpoint, since she seems to be at least as close to John as she is to her husband. Then John decides to go on a short driving holiday, but he doesn’t get far – his car is found abandoned a few miles from home and there are signs of violence. No sign of John though, alive or dead. Inspector Meredith has recently been transferred to the area and is put in charge of the case. First he’ll have to determine if John has been kidnapped or murdered before he can hope to discover whodunit…

I’ve loved a couple of John Bude’s books and been pretty unimpressed by a couple more, so wasn’t sure what to expect with this one. And it fell in the middle for me – reasonably enjoyable but not nearly as entertaining as he can be. I’m coming to the conclusion it’s the Inspector Meredith books that don’t work too well for me. Not that I don’t like the Inspector – as a character he’s fine and in this one there’s some entertaining stuff between him and his teenage son which gives him a more rounded feel than in some of the other books. It’s more the investigative technique that puts me off, very painstaking and slow, with lots of examining and re-examining clues as each fresh piece of information comes to light. I’m aware I’ve said similar things about a few of the Golden Age police procedurals, especially the Inspector French novels of Freeman Wills Crofts, so I was interested to learn from Martin Edwards’ The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books that Meredith is indeed modelled on French. However Edwards says that Meredith “possesses a sharper sense of humour” and an “innate humanity”, with both of which I agree. This kind of detailed procedural is clearly a specific style of mystery story popular at the time, and Bude certainly does it better than most.

Murder Mystery Mayhem Logo 2Challenge details:
Book: 35
Subject Heading: Serpents in Eden
Publication Year: 1936

He’s also very good at settings and here he brings the area of the Sussex Downs to life, with the sparsely populated rural district playing a major role in the solving of the mystery. First published in 1936, there was still little enough traffic on the roads for people to notice and recognise passing vehicles, and even remember them some days later. Local gossip plays its part too, with there being few enough people around for everyone to have a fair idea of what everyone else might be up to, or at least to think they do.

The solution seems a bit obvious from fairly early on, unfortunately, but the meat of the story is really in how Meredith goes about his investigation. As he struggles to find proof of a murder having been done much less to prove who may have done it, we see his frustration and the pressure he is put under by his superiors. But Meredith is a patient man, willing to admit when a theory isn’t working out and to go back to the beginning to formulate a new one.

Overall, then, enjoyable enough to while away a few hours but not a top rank mystery novel, which has been pretty much my reaction to all of the Inspector Meredith novels I’ve read so far. I think in future I’ll try to stick to Bude’s standalones where, in my limited experience of him, he seems to show much more inventiveness and humour, and achieves a better pace.

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TBR Thursday 274…

A tenth batch of murder, mystery and mayhem…

This is a challenge to read all 102 (102? Yes, 102) books listed in Martin Edwards’ guide to vintage crime, The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books. (100? Yes, 100.) Because of all the other great vintage crime being republished at the moment, I’m going very slowly with this challenge, and they’ve proved to be a bit of a mixed bag so far. Here’s the first batch for 2021 and the tenth overall…

At the Villa Rose by AEW Mason

I’ve never come across AEW Mason before, but the blurb sounds quite appealing. An inspiration for Poirot, eh? We’ll see…

The Blurb says: Aix-les-Bains is a gorgeous place to spend a vacation, and Harry Wethermill is happy to be on its lake, enjoying his time away from it all. Just when it seems life could not get any better, he meets Celia Harland, the stunning companion to the wealthy Madame Dauvray, and falls for the girl immediately. Harry’s courtship soon takes a dark turn, however, when Madame Dauvray turns up gruesomely murdered, a fortune’s worth of jewels missing from her room, and Celia nowhere to be found.

Fortunately for Harry, he has connections to the brilliant Inspector Hanaud, a detective from the Paris Sûreté. Soon the stout sleuth is on the case, vowing to follow the truth no matter where it leads. Is Celia as innocent as Harry believes? Or does her beautiful face mask the black heart of a killer? Nothing will escape the grasp of Inspector Hanaud, one of the mystery genre’s most distinctive heroes and an inspiration for Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot.

Challenge details

Book No: 8

Subject Heading: A New Era Dawns

Publication Year: 1910

Martin Edwards says: “Hanaud is a memorable creation, and his friendship with Ricardo one of the most attractive early variations on the theme of detective and admiring stooge.”

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The Cask by Freeman Wills Crofts

I’ve read a few of Crofts’ Inspector French books recently but this will be my introduction to Inspector Burnley. Their methods sound very similar…

The Blurb says: A strange container is found on the London docks, and its contents point to murder. The cask from Paris is bigger than the rest, its sides reinforced to hold the extraordinary weight within. As the longshoremen are bringing it onto the London docks, the cask slips, cracks, and spills some of its treasure: a wealth of gold sovereigns. As the workmen cram the spilled gold into their pockets, an official digs through the opened box, which is supposed to contain a statue. Beneath the gold he finds a woman’s hand—as cold as marble, but made of flesh.

He reports the body to his superiors, but when he returns, the cask has vanished. The case is given to Inspector Burnley, a methodical detective of Scotland Yard, who will confront a baffling array of clues and red herrings, alibis and outright lies as he attempts to identify the woman in the cask—and catch the man who killed her.

Challenge details

Book No: 16

Subject Heading: The Birth of the Golden Age

Publication Year: 1920

Edwards says: “The meticulous account of the detective work, coupled with the ingenuity of the construction (and deconstruction) of the alibi were to become Freeman Wills Crofts’ hallmarks, and they set his debut novel apart from the competition. Over the next twenty years, the book sold more than 100,000 copies.

* * * * *

The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey

Hmm… I’ve tried and failed with another of Tey’s books so, despite the intriguing blurb and its reputation as a classic, I’m a bit dubious about this one. But that means if it surprises me it can only be in a good way…

The Blurb says: Marion Sharpe and her mother seem an unlikely duo to be found on the wrong side of the law. Quiet and ordinary, they have led a peaceful and unremarkable life at their country home, The Franchise. Unremarkable that is, until the police turn up with a demure young woman on their doorstep. Not only does Betty Kane accuse them of kidnap and abuse, she can back up her claim with a detailed description of the attic room in which she was kept, right down to the crack in its round window.

But there’s something about Betty Kane’s story that doesn’t quite add up. Inspector Alan Grant of Scotland Yard is stumped. And it takes Robert Blair, local solicitor turned amateur detective, to solve the mystery that lies at the heart of The Franchise Affair

Challenge details

Book No: 87

Subject Heading: Fiction from Fact

Publication Year: 1948

Edwards says: “The plot’s origins lay in the strange case of Elizabeth Canning, a maidservant of eighteen who disappeared for almost a month in 1853, and claimed that she had been held against her will in a hay loft. 

* * * * *

Darkness at Pemberley by TH White

As a child, I read and loved White’s series about King Arthur, The Once and Future King, but I had no idea he’d written a mystery novel – just the one apparently… and it sounds pretty dreadful. I really do wonder sometimes what criteria Martin Edwards used to make his selections. He describes this one as ‘preposterous’…

The Blurb says: An unpleasant don called Beedon is found shot in his locked room in St Bernard’s College, Cambridge. The corpse of an undergraduate is also discovered, and the case appears to involve murder followed by suicide. The crime is suitably ingenious, but Inspector Buller solves the case rapidly, and confronts the culprit. He is rewarded with a prompt confession – in private. The bad news is that although the villain has killed three times in quick succession, Buller is quite unable to prove his guilt.

Disheartened, Buller resigns from the police force, and travels to Derbyshire to meet two old friends. At Pemberley, he tells the lovely Elizabeth Darcy (descended from ‘the famous Elizabeth’) and her brother Charles the story of his disastrous last case. Charles has personal experience of bitter injustice, and attempts to take the law into his own hands. Buller and the Darcys find themselves menaced by a deranged yet infinitely cunning murderer…

Challenge details

Book No: 88

Subject Heading: Singletons

Publication Year: 1932

Edwards says: “…the story takes several wildly improbable turns as the characters become increasingly embroiled in what Elizabeth describes as ‘this Four-Just-Men business’. Preposterous as the story becomes, it fulfils Gollancz’s promise of originality.”

* * * * *

All blurbs (except one) and covers taken from Goodreads or Amazon UK.
The blurb for Darkness at Pemberley and the quotes from Martin Edwards are from his book,
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books.

* * * * *

So…what do you think? Are you tempted?

TBR Thursday 270…

Episode 270

Still on the right track! The TBR has fallen by a massive 1 to 190! I really think I’m getting the hang of this now..

Here are a few more that should float my way soon…

Fiction

Luckenbooth by Jenni Fagan

Courtesy of Random House Cornerstone via NetGalley. I haven’t read any of Fagan’s books to date, but this one sounds as if it could be wonderful… or awful! Only one way to find out…

The Blurb says: The devil’s daughter rows to Edinburgh in a coffin, to work as maid for the Minister of Culture, a man who lives a dual life. But the real reason she’s there is to bear him and his barren wife a child, the consequences of which curse the tenement building that is their home for a hundred years. As we travel through the nine floors of the building and the next eight decades, the resident’s lives entwine over the ages and in unpredictable ways. Along the way we encounter the city’s most infamous Madam, a seance, a civil rights lawyer, a bone mermaid, a famous Beat poet, a notorious Edinburgh gang, a spy, the literati, artists, thinkers, strippers, the spirit world – until a cosmic agent finally exposes the true horror of the building’s longest kept secret. No. 10 Luckenbooth Close hurtles the reader through personal and global history – eerily reflecting modern life today.

* * * * *

Thriller

Domino Island by Desmond Bagley

Courtesy of HarperCollins. I have vague memories of reading a couple of Bagley’s books back in my early teens and enjoying them, but have never revisited him in my adult years. So I was delighted to receive a copy of this one – time to recapture a piece of my lost youth! 

The Blurb says: Bill Kemp, an ex-serviceman working in London as an insurance investigator, is sent to the Caribbean to determine the legitimacy of an expensive life insurance claim following the inexplicable death of businessman David Salton. His rapidly inflated premiums immediately before his death stand to make his young widow a very rich lady! Once there, Kemp discovers that Salton’s political ambitions had made him a lot of enemies, and local tensions around a forthcoming election are already spilling over into protest and violence on the streets. Salton also had friends in unexpected places, including the impossibly beautiful Leotta Tomsson, to whom there is much more than meets the eye. Kemp realises that Salton’s death and the local unrest are a deliberate smokescreen for an altogether more ambitious plot by an enemy in their midst, and as the island comes under siege, even Kemp’s army training seems feeble in the face of such a determined foe.

Unseen for more than 40 years and believed lost, Domino Island was accepted for publication in 1972 but then replaced by a different novel to coincide with the release of The Mackintosh Man, the Paul Newman film based on Bagley’s earlier novel The Freedom Trap. It is a classic Bagley tour de force with an all-action finale.

* * * * *

Fiction

The Plot Against America by Philip Roth

When Roth is at his best there is no one better at political fiction, and this is reputed to be one of his best. I’m not sure the blurb writer has grasped that it’s an alternative history, unless I missed the Lindbergh Presidency. But it sounds frighteningly relevant…

The Blurb says: When the renowned aviation hero and rabid isolationist Charles A. Lindbergh defeated Franklin Roosevelt by a landslide in the1940 presidential election, fear invaded every Jewish household in America. Not only had Lindbergh publicly blamed the Jews for pushing America towards a pointless war with Nazi Germany, but, upon taking office as the 33rd president of the United States, he negotiated a cordial ‘understanding’ with Adolf Hitler.

What then followed in America is the historical setting for this startling new novel by Pulitzer-prize winner Philip Roth, who recounts what it was like for his Newark family during the menacing years of the Lindbergh presidency, when American citizens who happened to be Jews had every reason to expect the worst.

* * * * *

Vintage Crime

Inspector French and the Crime at Guildford by Freeman Wills Crofts

Courtesy of HarperCollins again. This is the third of a little batch of three Inspector French books they sent me. So far I’ve liked one and loved one, so my expectations for this one are high…

The Blurb says: A weekend board meeting brings a jewellery firm’s accountant to the managing director’s impressive Guildford home. On the Sunday morning, he is found dead and is soon the subject of a murder inquiry by the local police. Meanwhile, Chief Inspector French is investigating the sensational burglary of half a million pounds’ worth of jewels from the safe of an office in London’s Kingsway. French must determine the connection between the theft and the murder as he embarks on a perilous chase to track down the criminals.

* * * * *

NB All blurbs and covers taken from Goodreads or Amazon UK.

* * * * *

So…what do you think? Are you tempted?

TBR Thursday 262…

Episode 262

I’m still reading considerably less than usual, though I’ve noticed my enthusiasm growing a little again in the last few days, so fingers crossed! Thank goodness for vintage crime, Christie audiobooks and horror stories – my saviours at the moment! So a couple of books out, a couple of books in and the TBR and I remain stuck on 199…

Here are a few more that I should get to soon…

Winner of the People’s Choice Poll

The Crow Trap by Ann Cleeves

Another exciting race this week! Black Water Rising leapt into an early lead, but The Crow Trap snuck up on the inside fence and soon stormed into a unassailable position! Good choice, People! I’m (almost) sure I’ll enjoy this one! It will be a January read…

The Blurb says: At the isolated Baikie’s Cottage on the North Pennines, three very different women come together to complete an environmental survey. Three women who, in some way or another, know the meaning of betrayal…

For team leader Rachael Lambert the project is the perfect opportunity to rebuild her confidence after a double-betrayal by her lover and boss, Peter Kemp. Botanist Anne Preece, on the other hand, sees it as a chance to indulge in a little deception of her own. And then there is Grace Fulwell, a strange, uncommunicative young woman with plenty of her own secrets to hide…

When Rachael arrives at the cottage, however, she is horrified to discover the body of her friend Bella Furness. Bella, it appears, has committed suicide – a verdict Rachael finds impossible to accept.

Only when the next death occurs does a fourth woman enter the picture – the unconventional Detective Inspector Vera Stanhope, who must piece together the truth from these women’s tangled lives…

* * * * *

Horror

Into the London Fog edited by Elizabeth Dearnley

Courtesy of the British Library. Another anthology from the BL’s Tales of the Weird series, this one taking us on a hopefully terrifying tour of the various districts that make up London. Fog was designed for horror, so the porpy is taking precautionary tranquilisers…

The Blurb says: As the fog thickens and the smoky dark sweeps across the capital, strange stories emerge from all over the city. A jilted lover returns as a demon to fulfill his revenge in Kensington, and a seance becomes a life and death struggle off Regents Canal. In the borough of Lambeth, stay clear of the Old House in Vauxhall Walk and be careful up in Temple—there’s something not right about the doleful, droning hum of the telegram wires overhead…

Join Elizabeth Dearnley on this atmospheric tour through the Big Smoke, a city which has long fueled the imagination of writers of the weird and supernormal. Waiting in the shadowy streets are tales from writers such as Charlotte Riddell, Lettie Galbraith, and Violet Hunt, who delight in twisting the urban myths and folk stories of the city into pieces of masterful suspense and intrigue. This collection will feature a map motif and notes before each story, giving readers the real-world context for these hauntings and encounters, and allowing the modern reader to seek out the sites themselves—should they dare.

* * * * *

Crime

Grave’s End by William Shaw

Courtesy of Quercus via NetGalley. I’ve only read one book by William Shaw so far and loved it, so have high hopes for this one…

The Blurb says: An unidentified body is found in a freezer. No one seems to know or care who it is or who placed it there.

DS Alexandra Cupidi couldn’t have realised that this bizarre discovery will be connected to the crisis in housing, the politics of environmentalism and specifically the protection given to badgers by the law. But there are dangerous links between these strange, reclusive, fiercely territorial creatures and the activism of Cupidi’s teenage daughter Zoe and her friend Bill South, her colleague Constable Jill Ferriter’s dating habits and long forgotten historic crimes of sexual abuse – and murder.

DS Alexandra Cupidi faces establishment corruption, class divide and environmental activism in this gripping new novel by a rising star of British crime fiction.

* * * * *

Vintage Crime

Inspector French: Sudden Death by Freeman Wills Crofts

Courtesy of HarperCollins. I’ve loved the couple of Crofts’ books I’ve previously read, so am looking forward to this one, especially since vintage crime has become my slump-busting comfort reading at the moment!

The Blurb says: To mark the publishing centenary of Freeman Wills Crofts, ‘The King of Detective Story Writers’, this is one of six classic crime novels being issued in 2020 featuring Inspector French, coming soon to television.

Anne Day is the new housekeeper at Frayle, the home of Mr Grinsmead and his invalid wife. To Anne’s horror, her intuition that something is very wrong in the house culminates in an unexpected death. With the police jumping to devastating conclusions, Inspector French arrives to investigate. With the narrative switching between Anne’s and French’s perspectives, giving alternately the outside and inside track of an ingenious and elaborate investigation, will tragedy strike a second time before the mystery is solved?

* * * * *

NB All blurbs and covers taken from Goodreads or Amazon UK.

* * * * *

So…what do you think? Are you tempted?

TBR Thursday 256…

Episode 256

All you people who’ve been worried about my shrinking TBR can breathe a sigh of relief this week – it’s gone up 2 to 198! Still below the magic 200, though, and of course it wasn’t my fault. I tried to stop the postman delivering the box of books, but he insisted, so what could I do?? I’m sure I’ll be back on track soon…

Here are a few more that will be tripping my way soon…

Factual

The Haunting of Alma Fielding by Kate Summerscale

Courtesy of Bloomsbury Publishing via NetGalley. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed several of Summerscale’s earlier books, loving her mix of true events and social commentary. This one sounds like a great way to kick off spooky season too…

The Blurb says: London, 1938. In the suburbs of the city, an ordinary young housewife has become the eye in a storm of chaos. In Alma Fielding’s modest home, china flies off the shelves, eggs fly through the air; stolen jewellery appears on her fingers, white mice crawl out of her handbag, beetles appear from under her gloves; in the middle of a car journey, a terrapin materialises on her lap. Nandor Fodor – a Jewish-Hungarian refugee and chief ghost hunter for the International Institute for Psychical Research – reads of the case, and hastens to the scene of the haunting. But when Fodor starts his scrupulous investigation, he discovers that the case is even stranger than it seems. By unravelling Alma’s peculiar history, he finds a different and darker type of haunting: trauma, alienation, loss – and the foreshadowing of a nation’s worst fears. As the spectre of Fascism lengthens over Europe, and as Fodor’s obsession with the case deepens, Alma becomes ever more disturbed. With rigour, daring and insight, the award-winning pioneer of non-fiction writing Kate Summerscale shadows Fodor’s enquiry, delving into long-hidden archives to find the human story behind a very modern haunting.

* * * * *

American Classic

The American by Henry James

Courtesy of Oxford World’s Classics. One from my Classics Club list. I’ve only read a few of James’ ghostly novellas before, and am not at all convinced his style won’t drive me insane in a full-length book. But we book bloggers must sometimes suffer for our art, so I shall gird up my loins (do women have loins? I should have paid more attention in anatomy classes. I know men have them… and pigs…) and face him bravely!  

The Blurb says: During a trip to Europe, Christopher Newman, a wealthy American businessman, asks the charming Claire de Cintre to be his wife. To his dismay, he receives an icy reception from the heads of her family, who find Newman to be a vulgar example of the American privileged class. Brilliantly combining elements of comedy, tragedy, romance and melodrama, this tale of thwarted desire vividly contrasts nineteenth-century American and European manners. Oxford’s edition of The American, which was first published in 1877, is the only one that uses James’ revised 1907 text.

* * * * *

Vintage Crime

Inspector French and the Mystery on Southampton Water by Freeman Wills Crofts

Courtesy of HarperCollins. To celebrate the publishing centenary of Freeman Wills Crofts, HarperCollins are reissuing three of his books and I was thrilled to receive a surprise box containing them all! I’ve only read one of the Inspector French books before, The 12:30 from Croydon, and loved it, and have been meaning to read more, so here’s the first. Couldn’t wait, so I’ve started it already…

The Blurb says: The Joymount Rapid Hardening Cement Manufacturing Company on the Solent is in serious financial trouble. Its rival, Chayle on the Isle of Wight, has a secret new manufacturing process and is underselling them. Having failed to crack the secret legitimately, two employees hatch a plot to break in and steal it. But the scheme does not go according to plan, resulting in damage and death, and Inspector French is brought in to solve one of the most dramatic and labyrinthine cases of his entire career. 

* * * * *

Dalziel & Pascoe on Audio

Child’s Play by Reginald Hill read by Colin Buchanan

I enjoyed Colin Buchanan as narrator of these books more than I was expecting in Exit Lines (review soon), so decided to go for the audiobook again for the next one in my slow re-read of this great series… 

The Blurb says: Geraldine Lomas’s son went missing in Italy during World War Two, but the eccentric old lady never accepted his death.

Now she is dead, leaving the Lomas beer fortune to be divided between an animal rights organization, a fascist front and a services benevolent fund. As disgruntled relatives gather by the graveside, the funeral is interrupted by a middle-aged man in an Italian suit, who falls to his knees crying, ‘Mama!’

Andy Dalziel is preoccupied with the illegal book one of his sergeants is running on who is to be appointed as the new chief Constable. But when a dead Italian turns up in the police car park, Peter Pascoe and his bloated superior are plunged into an investigation that makes internal police politics look like child’s play…

* * * * *

NB All blurbs and covers taken from Goodreads, Amazon UK or Audible UK.

* * * * *

So…what do you think? Are you tempted?

The Murder Mystery Mayhem Challenge…

The Story of Classic Crime in 100 (plus 2) Books

The challenge is to read and review all 102 of the books Martin Edwards includes on the main list in his excellent book on the development of the crime novel – The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books. Yes, 102. Don’t ask me why a book called “…100 Books” actually lists 102, but the spreadsheet never lies, so 102 it is!

I’ve decided not to list all 102 Books up front. The book has only just been published and somehow it seems unfair – almost like a major spoiler. So instead I’ll put links to all the books as I review them, so gradually – very gradually – it will grow to become a complete list. I’ll be reading them in totally random order as and when I acquire them, but on this master page I’ll organise them in the order and under the subject headings in the book. I reckon it will take me a minimum of four or five years to read them all, so if you can’t wait to know all 102 of the titles, then you’ll have to buy the book!

Chapter 1: A New Era Dawns

1.   The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

2.   The Four Just Men by Edgar Wallace  😀 😀 😀 😀

3.   The Case of Miss Elliott by Baroness Orczy  😀 😀 😀 🙂

4.

5.

6.   The Blotting Book by EF Benson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

7.   The Innocence of Father Brown by GK Chesterton  😦

8.   At the Villa Rose by AEW Mason  😀 😀 😀 😀

9.   The Eye of Osiris by R Austin Freeman  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

10.  The Lodger by Marie Belloc Lowndes  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

11.

Chapter 2: The Birth of the Golden Age

12.   Trent’s Last Case by EC Bentley  😀 😀 😀 😀

13.

14.   The Middle Temple Murder by JS Fletcher  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

15.

16.   The Cask by Freeman Wills Crofts  😦

17.   The Red House Mystery by AA Milne  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Chapter 3: The Great Detectives

18.   The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

19.   Clouds of Witness by Dorothy L Sayers  😐 😐

20.

21.

22.   The Poisoned Chocolates Case by Anthony Berkeley  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

23.

24.   The Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

25.   The Case of the Late Pig by Margery Allingham  😀 😀 😀 😀

26.

Chapter 4: ‘Play Up! Play Up! and Play the Game!’

27.

28.

29.

Chapter 5: Miraculous Murders

30.

31.   Murder of a Lady by Anthony Wynne  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

32.

Chapter 6: Serpents in Eden

33.   The Secret of High Eldersham by Miles Burton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

34.

35.   The Sussex Downs Murder by John Bude  😀 😀 😀 🙂

36.

Chapter 7: Murder at the Manor

37.   Crime at Diana’s Pool by Victor L Whitechurch  🙂 🙂 🙂

38.   Some Must Watch by Ethel Lina White  🙂 🙂 😐

39.

40.

Chapter 8: Capital Crimes

41.

42.   Bats in the Belfry by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

43.

Chapter 9: Resorting to Murder

44.   The Red Redmaynes by Eden Phillpotts  😀 😀 😀 😀

45.

46.

Chapter 10: Making Fun of Murder

47.   Quick Curtain by Alan Melville  😐 😐

48.   Case for Three Detectives by Leo Bruce (Abandoned – no review)

49.   The Moving Toyshop by Edmund Crispin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Chapter 11: Education, Education, Education

50.

51.

52.   Death at the President’s Lodging by Michael Innes 😦

Chapter 12: Playing Politics

53.

54.

55.

Chapter 13: Scientific Enquiries

56.

57.

58.   Death of an Airman by Christopher St. John Sprigg  😀 😀 😀 😀

59.

Chapter 14: The Long Arm of the Law

60.

61.

62.

63.   Green for Danger by Christianna Brand  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Chapter 15: The Justice Game

64.

65.   Verdict of Twelve by Raymond Postgate  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

66.

67.   Smallbone Deceased by Michael Gilbert  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Chapter 16: Multiplying Murders

68.

69.

70.

71.

72.   The ABC Murders by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Chapter 17: The Psychology of Crime

73.

74.   Payment Deferred by CS Forester  🙂 🙂 🙂

75.

76.

Chapter 18: Inverted Mysteries

77.

78.   Portrait of a Murderer by Anne Meredith  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

79.

Chapter 19: The Ironists

80.   Malice Aforethought by Francis Iles  🙂 🙂 🙂

81.   Family Matters by Anthony Rolls  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

82.

83.

Chapter 20: Fiction from Fact

84.

85.

86.

87.   The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Franchise Affair

Chapter 21: Singletons

88.   Darkness at Pemberley by TH White  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

89.   The Division Bell Mystery by Ellen Wilkinson  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

90.

 

Chapter 22: Across the Atlantic

91.   The Dain Curse by Dashiell Hammett  😀 😀 😀 😀

92.   The Curious Mr Tarrant by C. Daly King  😐 😐

93.

94.

95.   Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith  😀 😀 😀 😀

Chapter 23: Cosmopolitan Crimes

96.

97.   Pietr the Latvian by Georges Simenon  🙂 🙂 🙂

98.   Six Problems for Don Isidro Parodi by Jorge Luis Borges  😦

Chapter 24: The Way Ahead

99.

100.

101.  The Killer and the Slain by Hugh Walpole  😦

102.

* * * * * * * * *

Murder, mystery and mayhem!
Life would be so much duller without them!

Tuesday ’Tec! Ten Top Golden Age Detectives – A Guest Post from Martin Edwards

Warning! This post may be fatal to your TBR…

I am delighted to welcome Martin Edwards to the blog! Any regular visitor will know I’ve been enjoying Martin’s classic crime anthologies over recent months, discovering some long-forgotten authors as well as re-visiting old favourites. So when I got the chance to ask for Martin’s recommendations of essential Golden Age detectives for beginners, you can well imagine I had to be restrained from biting his hand off! So here it is… a very special post for this week’s…

Tuesday Tec2

Ten Top Golden Age Detectives

Many thanks to FictionFan for inviting me to talk about ten terrific Golden Age detectives. Opinions vary about how to define “the Golden Age of detective fiction”, but it’s logical to see it as spanning the years between the end of the First World War, and the beginning of the Second. Yes, detective stories with “Golden Age” elements appeared before, and in particular after, that period, but those characteristics became clearly established in the Twenties and the Thirties. So all the detectives I’ve chosen first appeared during those two decades.

Martin Edwards, who is also the author of his own series of crime novels, the Lake District Mysteries
Martin Edwards, who is also the author of his own series of crime novels,
the Lake District Mysteries

Hercule Poirot

Poirot is an egocentric, and a bundle of mannerisms, but so much more memorable than so many of the gimmicky detectives dreamed up by authors striving to create a worthy successor to Sherlock Holmes. His partnership with the nice but dim Captain Hastings was modelled on the Holmes-Watson relationship, but as Agatha Christie’s confidence grew, she married Hastings off, and gave Poirot free rein to demonstrate his gifts in all-time classics of the genre such as The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and Murder on the Orient Express. Hastings returned in the posthumously published Curtain, one of the under-rated masterpieces of Golden Age fiction, in which Poirot actually…no, you’ll have to read it for yourself.

Poirot
David Suchet as Hercule Poirot

Jane Marple

As down-to-earth as Poirot is eccentric, Miss Marple is a superb creation. Her USP is that, despite having spent her life in a small village, she has gained a deep understanding of human nature, which was shared by her creator, and helps to explain the astonishing and enduring success of Agatha Christie’s work. Miss Marple’s insight into the way that people – rich or poor, and from whatever background  –  behave enables her to identify whodunit when the police are baffled. She relies more on intuition than Poirot, the supreme logician, but her skill as a sleuth is matched by her decency and strength of character. Many talented actors have played Jane Marple, but few people, surely, would deny that Joan Hickson’s interpretation remains definitive.

Miss Marple
Joan Hickson as Miss Marple

Lord Peter Wimsey

Dorothy L. Sayers’ aristocratic sleuth started out as a sort of Bertie Wooster with a magnifying glass, but metamorphosed from an essentially comic, two-dimensional figure into a much more rounded character. The change reflects Sayers’ development (and increasingly lofty ambition) as a novelist, and took place at about the time that Wimsey fell in love with Harriet Vane, a detective novelist who in Strong Poison is on trial for the murder of her lover. Wimsey’s pursuit of Harriet reached a successful conclusion in Gaudy Night, set in academic Oxford, and Sayers’ attempt to transform the detective story into a “novel of manners”.

Dorothy L Sayers
Dorothy L Sayers

Albert Campion

Margery Allingham was an accomplished yet idiosyncratic detective novelist, and it is somehow typical of her unorthodoxy that Campion, her Great Detective, plays a subsidiary role in his first appearance, and seems to be something of a rogue. Like Wimsey, he evolved, but in a different direction, moving to centre stage in stories such as Police at the Funeral and even narrating the story in The Case of the Late Pig. Allingham eventually suggested that he was a member of the Royal Family, thus neatly outdoing Sayers as regards her hero’s blue blood.

Peter Davidson as Campion and Brian Glover as his manservant Lugg
Peter Davidson as Campion and Brian Glover as his manservant Lugg

Mrs Bradley

Gladys Mitchell’s first novel, Speedy Death, introduced one of the most remarkable of all Golden Age detectives, Mrs Bradley, who proceeded to appear in no fewer than 66 novels. There’s nothing meek or feminine about Mrs Bradley, who at one point herself commits murder. This reflects the underlying truth that Golden Age writers were fascinated by the concept of justice, and loved to explore scenarios in which the challenge was: how can one achieve a just outcome, when the established machinery of law and order is helpless? Mrs Bradley – sometimes known as “Mrs Crocodile” – is famously ugly, which makes it all the more baffling that when the books were televised in the late Nineties, she was played by Diana Rigg.

mrs bradley
Diana Rigg and Neil Dudgeon as Mrs Bradley and George Moody

Roger Sheringham

Anthony Berkeley was a cynic who loved to flavour his extremely clever whodunits with irony. His detective, the writer Roger Sheringham, is occasionally offensive, and quite frequently mistaken – he is the most fallible of Golden Age sleuths. It’s typical of Berkeley that, having allowed Roger to solve a very tricky puzzle in the short story “The Avenging Chance”, he expanded the plot into the novel The Poisoned Chocolates Case, and offered Roger’s theory about the crime as one of six different solutions – only for it to be proved mistaken. I’ve had the huge pleasure of devising a brand new explanation of the puzzle in a new edition of the book, to be published by the British Library in October. Suffice to say that, once again, Roger is confounded.

the poisoned chocolates case

Inspector Alleyn

Ngaio Marsh’s Scotland Yard man, Roderick Alleyn, is one of the gentlemanly cops (Michael Innes’ John Appleby is another) favoured by Golden Age writers who worried about the plausibility of having an amateur detective involved in a long series of convoluted murder mysteries. Marsh’s love of the theatre, and of her native New Zealand, provide fascinating backgrounds for several of Alleyn’s cases, such as Vintage Murder, and the quality of her writing, as well as her pleasing storylines, has ensured their continuing popularity.

Patrick Malahide in the BBC's Inspector Alleyn Mysteries, with Belinda Lang as Agatha Troy
Patrick Malahide and Belinda Lang as Roderick Alleyn and Agatha Troy

Dr Gideon Fell

It’s often forgotten that many American authors wrote Golden Age detective stories. Most were overshadowed by private eye stories from the likes of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett, but John Dickson Carr’s books about Dr Gideon Fell stand out from the crowd. Carr, an Anglophile, set the Fell stories in Britain, and specialised in macabre and atmospheric stories about seemingly impossible crimes. Fell was modelled on G.K. Chesterton, creator of Father Brown, and gives a memorable “Locked Room Lecture”, discussing different ways of committing a murder in an apparently locked room, in The Hollow Man. Carr’s exceptionally ingenious stories fell out of fashion for a while, but the TV success of Jonathan Creek, and more recently Death in Paradise, shows that a huge audience remains for complex mysteries, solved thanks to mind-blowing ingenuity. When it comes to figuring out locked room mysteries, nobody does it better than Gideon Fell.

Gideon-Fell
Gideon Fell

Inspector French

Freeman Wills Crofts’ Inspector Joseph French is the antithesis of the brilliant maverick detective. He’s a career policeman, not blessed with the aristocratic forebears of Roderick Alleyn, but gifted with a capacity for endless hard work, an eye for detail, and a relentless determination to see justice done. He’s especially adept at dismantling apparently unbreakable alibis. Occasionally, Crofts wrote “inverted mysteries”, in which we see the culprit commit murder so cleverly that he seems sure to get away with it. And then, in books like the intriguing and original zoo-based mystery Antidote to Venom, we watch French remorselessly pursue his prey until justice is done. French is a good man, but an implacable adversary for any criminal.

Inspector Maigret

Georges Simenon is not generally associated with Golden Age detective fiction, because his literary concerns lay much more with people than plot. (His fellow Belgian, the regrettably forgotten S.A Steeman, was much closer in spirit to Agatha Christie). Yet Simenon read and absorbed Christie’s early novels, and several of his stories about the Parisian policeman Inspector Jules Maigret are very clever. Maigret is a splendidly rounded character, a reliable family man admired and respected by his close colleagues. His potential was recognised as early as 1932 by the legendary film-maker Jean Renoir, who cast his brother as Maigret in Night at the Crossroads, and he was brought to life once again on television this year by Rowan Atkinson. Maigret’s thoughtful methods influenced a generation of post-war detectives, including W.J. Burley’s Cornish cop Wycliffe, and Alan Hunter’s Inspector George Gently as well as Gil North’s Sergeant Caleb Cluff.

LA-NUIT-DU-CARREFOUR-1932

* * * * * * *

The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards is published by HarperCollins. Martin Edwards has also written the introduction for Sergeant Cluff Stands Firm by Gil North which is being republished by British Library Crime Classics on 12 July to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the author’s birth.

* * * * * * *

Many thanks, Martin, for a most enjoyable and informative post!

I’ll be seeking out the books Martin has mentioned over the next few months – some, like Inspector French and Gideon Fell, will be new to me while others are old acquaintances I’ve neglected for too long. And check back tomorrow for my review of Sergeant Cluff Stands Firm – spoiler alert! I thought it was…. nah! I’ll tell you tomorrow!

Crime and Thriller Fiction listed by Title

A

The A26 by Pascal Garnier  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The ABC Murders by Agatha Christie read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Caribbean Mystery by Agatha Christie read by Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Case for Paul Temple – BBC Audio dramatisation by Francis Durbridge  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

The Accident on the A35 (Insp. Gorski 2) by Graeme Macrae Burnet  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Clubbable Woman (Dalziel and Pascoe 1) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Dangerous Crossing by Rachel Rhys  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Dark and Broken Heart by RJ Ellory  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Dark and Twisted Tide by Sharon Bolton (Lacey Flint 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Dark Redemption (Carrigan and Miller 1) by Stav Sherez  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Darker Domain (Karen Pirie 2) by Val McDermid  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Adventure of the Dancing Men by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective by Susannah Stapleton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Arthur Conan Doyle/Derek Jacobi  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Adversary by Emmanuel Carrère  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Dying Fall (Ruth Galloway 5) by Elly Griffiths  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
A Fairy in the Flat/A Pot of Tea (Tommy & Tuppence)/Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Affair at the Bungalow (Miss Marple short) by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
After the Fire (Maeve Kerrigan 6) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀

Agatha Raisin and the Love from Hell by MC Beaton/Penelope Keith  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
A Good Way to Go by Peter Helton  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Killing Kindness (Dalziel and Pascoe 6) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
All That’s Dead (Logan McRae 12) by Stuart MacBride  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
A Matter of Motive (Patricia Stanley 1) by Margot Kinberg  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

American Heiress: The Kidnapping of Patty Hearst by Jeffrey Toobin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Ambitious Card (Eli Marks 1) by John Gaspard  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Amok by Sebastian Fitzek (Audible Studios Dramatisation)  😀 😀 😀 🙂
A Mystery of the Underground by John Oxenham  😀 😀 😀 😀
An Advancement of Learning (Dalziel and Pascoe 2) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
An April Shroud (Dalziel and Pascoe 4) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Necessary Evil (Sam Wyndham 2) by Abir Mukherjee  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Annals of Sherlock Holmes by Paul D Gilbert  😦 😦
A Pleasure and a Calling by Phil Hogan  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Appointment with Death (Poirot) by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Rising Man (Sam Wyndham 1) by Abir Mukherjee  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Arsenal Stadium Mystery by Leonard Gribble  😀 😀 😀 😀
Arson Plus (The Continental Op)  😀 😀 😀 😀

A Season for the Dead (Nic Costa 1) by David Hewson 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
A Study in Scarlet 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Surprise for Christmas edited by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Asylum by Johan Theorin 😀 😀 😀 😀
At the Villa Rose by AEW Mason  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Time to Kill by John Grisham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Very British Murder by Lucy Worsley  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Voice Like Velvet by Donald Henderson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

B

Bad Blood (Intercrime 2) by Arne Dahl  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bats in the Belfry by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Beat Goes On: The Complete Rebus Stories by Ian Rankin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Beautiful Dead by Belinda Bauer  🙂 🙂 🙂
Before You Die (DI Lorraine Fisher 2) by Samantha Hayes  😦 😦
The Beggar Bride by Gillian White  😀 😀 😀 😀
Behind the Night Bazaar (Jayne Keeney 1) by Angela Savage  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Belting Inheritance by Julian Symons  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bet Your Life (Jess Tennant 2) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bitter Fruits (DI Erica Martin 1) by Alic Clark-Platts  😀 😀 😀 😀
Bitter Orange by Claire Fuller  🙂 🙂 🙂
Bitter Water (Douglas Brodie 2) by Gordon Ferris  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Black Cabinet by Patricia Wentworth  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Blackhouse (Lewis Trilogy 1) by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Black River Road by Debra Komar  😀 😀 😀 😀
Black Widow (Jack Parlabane 7) by Chris Brookmyre  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Blessed Are Those Who Thirst (Hanne Wilhelmsen 2) by Anne Holt  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Blinded Man (Intercrime 1) by Arne Dahl  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Blood Card (Stephens and Mephisto 3) by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Blotting Book by EF Benson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke  😀 😀 😀 😀
Blue Murder (Flaxborough Chronicles 10) by Colin Watson  😀 😀 😀 😀
Bodies from the Library 2 edited by Tony Medawar  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bodies from the Library 3 edited by Tony Medawar  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Body in the Dumb River by George Bellairs  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bones and Silence (Dalziel and Pascoe 11) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Bones of Paris (Harris Stuyvesant 2) by Laurie R King  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Bravo of London (Max Carrados) by Ernest Bramah  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Broomsticks Over Flaxborough (Flaxborough 7) by Colin Watson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Broken Ground (Karen Pirie 5) by Val McDermid  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Broken Promise by Linwood Barclay  😐 😐
The Bullet Catch (Eli Marks 2) by John Gaspard  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bump in the Night (Flaxborough Chronicles 2) by Colin Watson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Burning (Maeve Kerrigan 1) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
By Its Cover (Commissario Brunetti 23) by Donna Leon  😀 😀 😀 😀

C

The Cabin (Cold Case Quartet 2) by Jørn Lier Horst  😐 😐
Calico Joe by John Grisham  🙂 🙂 😐
Capital Crimes: London Mysteries by Martin Edwards (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Case Histories (Jackson Brodie 1) by Kate Atkinson  😐 😐
The Case of the Dotty Dowager by Cathy Ace  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Case of Miss Elliott by Baroness Orczy  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Case of Oscar Brodski by R Austin Freeman  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Case of the Late Pig by Margery Allingham  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Case of the Weird Sisters by Charlotte Armstrong  😦 😦
The Cask by Freeman Wills Crofts  😦
Cast Iron (Enzo Files 6) by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀
Castle Skull by John Dickson Carr  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Caves of Steel (Elijah Bailey 1) by Isaac Asimov  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Cécile is Dead (Maigret 20) by Georges Simenon  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Chalk Girl (Mallory 10) by Carol O’Connell  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Checkmate to Murder (Inspector MacDonald 25) by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Cheltenham Square Murder by John Bude  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐
The Chessmen (Lewis Trilogy 3) by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Chianti Flask by Marie Belloc Lowndes  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Child by Sebastian Fitzek (Audible Studios Dramatisation)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Child’s Play (Dalziel and Pascoe 9) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Chill Factor by Richard Falkirk  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Christmas Card Crime and Other Stories by Martin Edwards (ed.)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Christmas Egg by Mary Kelly  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Clocks (Poirot) by Agatha Christie read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Close to the Bone (Logan McRae 8) by Stuart MacBride  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Close Your Eyes (Joe O’Loughlin) by Michael Robotham  😀 😀 😀 😀
Clouds of Witness (Lord Peter Wimsey 2) by Dorothy L Sayers  😐 😐
Coffin Road by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Cold, Cold Ground (Sean Duffy 1) by Adrian McKinty  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Collini Case by Ferdinand von Schirach  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Colour of Murder by Julian Symons  😀 😀 😀 😀
Conan Doyle for the Defence by Margalit Fox  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Confessions by Kanae Minato  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Conjure-Man Dies by Rudolph Fisher  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Continental Crimes by Martin Edwards (editor)  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Conviction by Denise Mina  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Cop Hater (87th Precinct 1) by Ed McBain  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Copycat by Gillian White  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Corpse in the Waxworks by John Dickson Carr  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Crime at Black Dudley by Margery Allingham/David Thorpe  😀 😀 😀 😀
Crime at Diana’s Pool by Victor L Whitechurch  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Crime Fiction Handbook by Peter Messent  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Crime of Privilege by Walter Walker  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Crimson Rose (Kit Marlowe 5) by MJ Trow  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Crimson Snow: Winter Mysteries by Martin Edwards (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Critical Incidents (Robin Lyons 1) by Lucie Whitehouse
Crossed Skis by Carol Carnac  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Crow Trap (Vera Stanhope 1) by Ann Cleeves  🙂 🙂 🙂
Cruel Acts (Maeve Kerrigan 8) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Curious Habits of Doctor Adams by Jane Robins  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Curious Mr Tarrant by C. Daly King  😐 😐
The Cutting Place (Maeve Kerrigan 9) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

D

The Dain Curse (The Continental Op) by Dashiell Hammett  😀 😀 😀 😀
Daisy in Chains by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Danger in Cat World by Nina Post  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Dare Me by Megan Abbott  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Dark Fire (Matthew Shardlake 2) by CJ Sansom  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Darkness at Pemberley by TH White  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Dead of Winter (John Madden 3) by Rennie Airth  😀 😀 😀 😀
Dead Scared (Lacey Flint 2) by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Dead Shall Be Raised by George Bellairs  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Dead Witness edited by Michael Sims  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Dead Woman Walking by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Deadheads (Dalziel and Pascoe 7) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Deadland (DS Alex Cupidi 2) by William Shaw  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death at the President’s Lodging (Inspector Appleby 1) by Michael Innes  😦
Death at Wentwater Court (Daisy Dalrymple 1) by Carola Dunn  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Death Has Deep Roots (Inspector Hazlerigg 5) by Michael Gilbert  😀 😀 😀 😀
Death in Fancy Dress by Anthony Gilbert  🙂 🙂 🙂

Death in a Scarlet Gown (Murray of Letho 1) by Lexie Conyngham  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Death In Captivity by Michael Gilbert  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death in White Pyjamas by John Bude  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death Knows No Calendar by John Bude  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death Makes a Prophet by John Bude  🙂 🙂 🙂
Death of an Airman by Christopher St. John Sprigg 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death of a Red Heroine (Inspector Chen 1) by Qiu Xiaolong 😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Death of Mrs Westaway by Ruth Ware 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death of the Demon (Hanne Wilhelmsen 3) by Anne Holt 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Death of Kings (John Madden 5) by Rennie Airth 😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Death on Dartmoor (Dan Hellier 2) by Bernie Steadman  😀 😀 😀 😀
Death on the Riviera by John Bude  😀 😀 😀 😀

Deep Waters edited by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Defence by Steve Cavanagh  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Devil and the River by RJ Ellory  🙂 🙂 🙂
Different Class by Joanne Harris  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Dinner by Herman Koch  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Disappearance of Adèle Bedeau by Graeme Macrae Burnet 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Disappearance of Mr Davenheim (Poirot) by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Disappearing Act by Catherine Steadman  😀 😀 😀 😀
Dissolution (Matthew Shardlake 1) by CJ Sansom  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Division Bell Mystery by Ellen Wilkinson  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Dominion by CJ Sansom  😀 😀 😀 😀
Domino Island by Desmond Bagley  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Downfall (Joel Williams 4) by Margot Kinberg  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Dry (Aaron Falk 1) by Jane Harper read by Stephen Shanahan  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Dry Bones (Enzo Files 1) by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Dungeon House by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Dying for Christmas by Tammy Cohen  😀 😀 😀 😀

E

The Earthquake Bird by Susanna Jones  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Echoes from the Dead (Öland Quartet 1) by Johan Theorin  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Echoes of Sherlock Holmes ed. Laurie R King and Leslie S Klinger  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Eleven Days (Carrigan and Miller 2) by Stav Sherez  😀 😀 😀 😀
The End of Everything by Megan Abbott  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The End of the Web by George Sims  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Entry Island by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Even Dogs in the Wild (Rebus 20) by Ian Rankin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Even the Dead (Quirke 7) by Benjamin Black  🙂 🙂 😐
Evil Under the Sun by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Excellent Intentions by Richard Hull  😀 😀 🙂
Execution (Giordano Bruno 6) by SJ Parris
The Execution of Noa P. Singleton by Elizabeth L Silver  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Exit Lines (Dalziel and Pascoe 8) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀
Exposure by Helen Dunmore  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Eye of Osiris by R Austin Freeman  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

F

The Facts of Life and Death by Belinda Bauer 😀 😀 😀 😀
Fallen Land by Patrick Flanery  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Falling Freely, As If In A Dream by Leif GW Persson  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Falling in Love (Commissario Brunetti 24) by Donna Leon  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
False Witness by Karin Slaughter 😦
Family Matters by Anthony Rolls  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Fantastic Horror of the Cat in the Bag by Dorothy L Sayers  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Fatal Inheritance by Rachel Rhys  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Fear is the Rider by Kenneth Cook  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Fell Murder by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Fellowship with Demons (Murray of Letho 5) by Lexie Conyngham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Fever by Megan Abbott  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Final Twist (Colter Shaw 3) by Jeffery Deaver  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Fire In the Thatch by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
First One Missing by Tammy Cohen  🙂 🙂 😐
The Follower by Koethi Zan  🙂 🙂 😐
Force of Nature (Aaron Falk 2) by Jane Harper  🙂 🙂 🙂
Foreign Bodies edited by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Forty Acres by Dwayne Alexander Smith  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Four Just Men by Edgar Wallace  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Free Fall (John Ceepak Mysteries 8) by Chris Grabenstein  😀 😀 😀 😀
Furious Hours by Casey Cep  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

G

Gallowglass (Douglas Brodie 4) by Gordon Ferris  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Ghost Fields (Ruth Galloway 7) by Elly Griffiths  🙂 🙂 😐
The Ghost Marriage (China Thrillers) by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Girl Who Wasn’t There by Ferdinand von Schirach  😐 😐
Give Me Your Hand by Megan Abbott  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Golden Sabre by Jon Cleary  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Goodbye Man (Colter Shaw 2) by Jeffery Deaver  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Grand Cru Heist (The Winemaker Detective Series 2) by Alaux & Balen  😀 😀 😀 😀
Green for Danger by Christianna Brand  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Guesthouse by Abbie Frost  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Guest List by Lucy Foley  🙂 🙂 🙂

H

The Hammer of God by GK Chesterton  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Hampstead Murder by Christopher Bush  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Hanging Judge by Michael Ponsor  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Hardcastle’s Quartet by Graham Ison  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Her by Harriet Lane 😐 😐 😐
Here Be Dragons: A Short Story (Lacey Flint) by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly  🙂 🙂 😐
He Who Dies Last by Christoph Spielberg  🙂 🙂 🙂
Himself by Jess Kidd  😀 😀 😀 🙂
His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Honjin Murders by Seishi Yokomizo  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle/Derek Jacobi 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Hour of Peril by Daniel Stashower  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz  😀 😀 😀 😀
How to Fall (Jess Tennant 1) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀
Humber Boy B by Ruth Dugdall  😀 😀 😀 😀

I

I Am No One by Patrick Flanery  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Ice by Laline Paull  🙂 🙂
The Ice Princess (Patrik Hedström 1) by Camilla Läckberg  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Ice Shroud by Gordon Ell  😀 😀 😀 😀
Identical by Scott Turow  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
If Snow Hadn’t Fallen (Lacey Flint Novella) by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀
I Hear the Sirens in the Street (Sean Duffy 2) by Adrian McKinty  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐
I’ll Keep You Safe by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote  😀 😀 😀 😀
Indelible (A Chris Honeysett Mystery) by Peter Helton  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Innocence of Father Brown by GK Chesterton  😦
In the Blood by Lisa Unger  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐
In the Heat of the Night by John Ball  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
In the Woods (Dublin Murder Squad 1) by Tana French  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Inspector French and the Crime at Guildford by Freeman Wills Crofts 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Inspector French: Sudden Death by Freeman Wills Crofts  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Invisible Assistant (An Eli Marks Short Story) by John Gaspard  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Invisible Code (Bryant & May 10) by Christopher Fowler  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐
The Invisible Man from Salem (Leo Junker 1) by Christoffer Carlsson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
I, the Jury by Mickey Spillane  😀 😀 😀 😀
It Walks By Night by John Dickson Carr  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

J

Jack of Spades by Joyce Carol Oates  😐 😐
Jane Steele by Lyndsay Faye  😦
The Janus Stone (Ruth Galloway 2) by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 😀
Judas Child by Carol O’Connell  😀 😀 😀

K

The Katharina Code (William Wisting 12) by Jørn Lier Horst  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Kill (Maeve Kerrigan 5) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Killer and the Slain by Hugh Walpole  😦
Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Killing Kind by Jane Casey  🙂 🙂 🙂
King Solomon’s Mines by H Rider Haggard  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Knock, Murderer, Knock by Harriet Rutland  😀 😀 😀 😀
Knowledge of Sins Past (Murray of Letho 2) by Lexie Conyngham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

L

Laidlaw (Laidlaw Trilogy 1) by William McIlvanney  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Lamentation (Matthew Shardlake 6) by CJ Sansom  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Land of Dreams (Minnesota Trilogy 1) by Vidar Sundstøl  😦 😦
The Last Clinic by Gary Gusick  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Last Girl (Maeve Kerrigan 3) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Last National Service Man (Dalziel and Pascoe) by Reginald Hill 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Last Refuge by Craig Robertson 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Last Winter of Dani Lancing by PD Viner  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Left for Dead (A Maeve Kerrigan Prequel) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀

The Legacy (Children’s House 1) by Yrsa Sigurdardóttir  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Less Dead by Denise Mina  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Let the Dead Speak (Maeve Kerrigan 7) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Lewis Man (Lewis Trilogy 2) by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Life I Left Behind by Colette McBeth  😐 😐
Life or Death by Michael Robotham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Like This, For Ever (Lacey Flint 3) by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Linking Rings (Eli Marks 4) by John Gaspard  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Listening Walls by Margaret Millar  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Litigators by John Grisham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Little Black Lies by Sharon Bolton 🙂 🙂 😐
Little Lies by Liane Moriarty  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Lodger by Marie Belloc Lowndes  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Lonelyheart 4122 (Flaxborough Chronicles 4) by Colin Watson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Long Arm of the Law edited by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀
The Long Call (Two Rivers 1) by Ann Cleeves  😦
The Long Drop by Denise Mina  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler  😐 😐
The Long Shadow (Annika Bengtzon 8) by Liza Marklund  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Lost (Joe O’Loughlin 2) by Michael Robotham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Lost Gallows by John Dickson Carr  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Lost Man by Jane Harper  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

M

The Magnificent Spilsbury by Jane Robins  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret and the Ghost (Maigret 62) by Georges Simenon  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret and the Reluctant Witnesses (Maigret 53) by Georges Simenon  😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret and the Tall Woman (Maigret 38) by Georges Simenon  😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret’s Revolver (Maigret 40) by Georges Simenon  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Maigret Takes a Room (Maigret 37) by Georges Simenon  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Malice Aforethought by Francis Iles  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Malice of Waves (Cal McGill 3) by Mark Douglas-Home  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Man from London by Georges Simenon  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Man Who Didn’t Fly by Margot Bennett  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Man With No Face by Peter May  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Martian by Andy Weir  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Measure of Malice edited by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Messenger of Athens by Anne Zouroudi  😦
The Methods of Sergeant Cluff by Gil North  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Midas Murders (Pieter Van In 2) by Pieter Aspe 😦
The Middle Temple Murder by JS Fletcher  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Midnight in Peking by Paul French  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Miraculous Mysteries by Martin Edwards (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Miser’s Dream (Eli Marks 3) by John Gaspard  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Miss Blaine’s Prefect and the Golden Samovar by Olga Wojtas 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mistletoe Murder and Other Stories by PD James  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Money Tree by Gordon Ferris  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Monogram Murders (Hercule Poirot 1) by Sophie Hannah  😦
Moon in a Dead Eye by Pascal Garnier  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Moriarty by Anthony Horowitz  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Morse’s Greatest Mystery by Colin Dexter  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Mother Loves Me by Abby Davies  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Moving Finger by Agatha Christie/Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Moving Toyshop (Gervase Fen 3) by Edmund Crispin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Mrs Hudson and the Malabar Rose (Mrs Hudson 2) by Martin Davies  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Mrs Maybrick (Crime Archive Series) by Victoria Blake  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Mrs McGinty’s Dead by Agatha Christie/Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mugger (87th Precinct 2) by Ed McBain  🙂 🙂 🙂
Murder at the Manor by Martin Edwards (editor)  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Murder at the Maples (Flora Lively 1) by Joanne Phillips  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Murder at the Vicarage (Miss Marple) by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder by Matchlight by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Murdered Banker by Augusto De Angelis  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Murder in the Bookshop by Carolyn Wells  🙂 🙂 🙂
Murder in the Mill-Race by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder Is No Joke by Rex Stout  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder of a Lady: A Scottish Mystery by Anthony Wynne  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Murder of a Quack by George Bellairs  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Murder of my Aunt by Richard Hull  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie read by David Suchet  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Murder, She Said: The Quotable Miss Marple by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀
Murder, She Wrote: Design for Murder by Donald Bain 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder’s A Swine by Nap Lombard  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
My Second Death by Lydia Cooper  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Mystery of Briony Lodge by David Bagchi  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mystery of Cloomber by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mystery of Horne’s Copse by Anthony Berkeley  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mystery of the Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mystery on Southampton Water by Freeman Wills Crofts  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

N

The Never Game (Colter Shaw 1) by Jeffery Deaver  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Never List by Koethi Zan  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The New World by Andrew Motion  😀 😀 😀 😀
Nightblind (Dark Iceland 5) by Ragnar Jónasson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Night Ferry by Michael Robotham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Nightmare Thief by Meg Gardiner  🙂 🙂 🙂
Nightwoods by Charles Frazier  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Now You See Me (Lacey Flint 1) by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀
Now You See Them (Stephens and Mephisto 5) by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 🙂

O

The Old Buzzard Had It Coming by Donis Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Old Religion by Martyn Waites  🙂 🙂 🙂
Oliver Twisted (Ivy Meadows 3) by Cindy Brown  😀 😀 😀 😀

One for Our Baby by John Sandrolini 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
One Good Turn (Jackson Brodie 2) by Kate Atkinson  😦
One, Two, Buckle My Shoe (Poirot) by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Open Wounds (Davie McCall 4) by Douglas Skelton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Original Skin (Aector McAvoy 2) by David Mark  😦
The Other Typist by Suzanne Rindell 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Outcast Dead (Ruth Galloway 6) by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Out of Bounds (Karen Pirie 4) by Val McDermid  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

OxCrimes (introduction to anthology) by Ian Rankin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

P

The Pact by Sharon Bolton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Papers of Tony Veitch (Laidlaw Trilogy 2) by William McIlvanney  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Parade by Shuichi Yoshaida  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Past Tense (Joel Williams 3) by Margot Kinberg  😀 😀 😀 😀
Payment Deferred by CS Forester  🙂 🙂 🙂
Penance by Kanae Minato  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Peril at End House (Poirot) by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Pietr the Latvian (Maigret 1) by Georges Simenon  🙂 🙂 🙂
Pilgrim Soul (Douglas Brodie 3) by Gordon Ferris  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Plotters by Un-Su Kim  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Poisoned Chocolates Case by Anthony Berkeley  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Poisoned Rock (Sullivan and Broderick 2) by Robert Daws  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Port of London Murders by Josephine Bell  😀 😀 😀 😀
Portrait of a Murderer by Anne Meredith  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Postman Always Rings Twice by James M Cain  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Progress of a Crime by Julian Symons  🙂 🙂 🙂
Psycho by Robert Bloch  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Purity of Vengeance (Department Q 4) by Jussi Adler-Olsen  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐
The Purloined Letter by Edgar Allan Poe  😦 😦

Q

Quick Curtain by Alan Melville  😦 😦

R

Rather Be the Devil (Rebus 21) by Ian Rankin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Raven Black (Shetland 1) by Ann Cleeves  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Razor Edge by Anthony Berkeley  😀 😀 🙂

The Reckoning (John Madden 4) by Rennie Airth  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Reckoning (Maeve Kerrigan 2) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Red Redmaynes by Eden Phillpotts  😀 😀 😀 😀
Redemption (Department Q 3) by Jussi Adler-Olsen  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Redemption of Alexander Seaton by Shona MacLean  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Red House Mystery by AA Milne  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Resorting to Murder: Holiday Mysteries by Martin Edwards (editor) 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Return of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  😀 😀 😀 😀
Revelation (Matthew Shardlake 4) by CJ Sansom  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The River at Night by Erica Ferencik  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Rock (Sullivan and Broderick 1) by Robert Daws  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Rubbernecker by Belinda Bauer  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Ruling Passion (Dalziel and Pascoe 3) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Runaway by Peter May 😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

S

Saints of the Shadow Bible (Rebus 19) by Ian Rankin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Sans Pareil Mystery byKaren Charlton  🙂 😐
The Savage Hour by Elaine Proctor  😀 😀 😀 😀
Scarweather by Anthony Rolls  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Secret Adversary (Tommy and Tuppence 1) by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Secret of High Eldersham by Miles Burton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Secrets of Strangers by Charity Norman  😀 😀 😀 😀
See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt  😦
Serena by Ron Rash  😦 😦
Sergeant Cluff Stands Firm by Gil North  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Second Life by SJ Watson  🙂 🙂 😐

Secret Diary of PorterGirl by Lucy Brazier  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Secret Poisoner by Linda Stratmann  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Seeker by SG MacLean  🙂 🙂
Settling Scores edited by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Seventh Link by Margaret Mayhew  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The 7th Woman (Paris Homicide 1) by Frédérique Molay  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Shallow Waters (DI Hannah Robbins 1) by Rebecca Bradley  😀 😀 😀 🙂

The Shapeshifters by Stefan Spjut  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sherlock Holmes: The Dark Mysteries by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection read by Stephen Fry  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sherlock Holmes Further Collection/Sir Arthur Conan Doyle/BBC Audio  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
She Who Was No More by Boileau-Narcejac  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Shop Window Murders by Vernon Loder  😀 😀 🙂
The Shut Eye by Belinda Bauer 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Sign of the Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Silence by Susan Allott  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Silent Kill (Maeve Kerrigan 8.5) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Silent Witnesses: A History of Forensic Science by Nigel McCrery  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Silver: Return to Treasure Island by Andrew Motion 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sinister Dexter (PorterGirl 3) by Lucy Brazier  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Siren by Annemarie Neary  🙂 🙂 😐
Six Problems for Don Isidro Parodi by Jorge Luis Borges  😦
Six Years by Harlan Coben  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Skeleton Road by Val McDermid  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Sleeper by Gillian White  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Smallbone Deceased (Inspector Hazlerigg 4) by Michael Gilbert  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Smith by Leon Garfield  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Smoke and Ashes (Sam Wyndham 3) by Abir Mukherjee  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Smoke and Mirrors (Stephens and Mephisto 2) by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Snap by Belinda Bauer  🙂 🙂 🙂
Snowblind (Dark Iceland 1) by Ragnar Jónasson  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Some Must Watch by Ethel Lina White  🙂 🙂 😐
Somebody at the Door by Raymond Postgate  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Someone to Watch Over Me by Yrsa Sigurdardóttir  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Son by Jo Nesbo  🙂 🙂 🙂
Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake 3) by CJ Sansom  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Spiteful Shadow by Peter Tremayne  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Spoilt Kill by Mary Kelly  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Spy Who Came In from the Cold by John le Carré  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Square of Revenge (Pieter Van In) by Pieter Aspe  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Stealer of Marble by Edgar Wallace  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books by Martin Edwards  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Story Keeper by Anna Mazzola  😀 😀 😀 😀
Strange Loyalties (Laidlaw Trilogy 3) by William McIlvanney  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Stranger (Patrik Hedström and Erica Falck 4) Camilla Läckberg  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Stranger by Harlan Coben  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Stranger You Know (Maeve Kerrigan 4) by Jane Casey  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Strangling on the Stage (Fethering Mysteries) by Simon Brett  😦 😦
Summer House with Swimming Pool by Herman Koch  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Surfeit of Suspects by George Bellairs  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Survivors by Jane Harper  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Suspect (Joe O’Loughlin 1) by Michael Robotham  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Sussex Downs Murder (Inspector Meredith) by John Bude  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Sweet William by Iain Maitland  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sword by Bogdan Teodorescu  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sycamore Row by John Grisham  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Sydney Chambers and the Shadow of Death by James Runcie  😀 😀 😀 😀

T

The Taggart Assignment by Vincent Starrett  😀 😀 😀 😀
Taken by Lisa Stone  😀 😀 😀 😀
Tangerine by Christine Mangan  😦
The Tender Herb (Murray of Letho 6) by Lexie Conyngham  😀 😀 😀 😀
Ten Years Beyond Baker Street by Cay Van Ash  😀 😀 😀 😀
Testament of a Witch (John Mackenzie 2) by Douglas Watt  😀 😀 😀 😀
Testimony by Scott Turow  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
That Dark Remembered Day by Tom Vowler  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Thirteen Guests by J Jefferson Farjeon 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Thirteen Problems by Agatha Christie read by Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan  😀 😀 😀 😀
Three Bullets by RJ Ellory  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Ties that Bind by Erin Kelly  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Till Death Do Us Part (Gideon Fell 15) by John Dickson Carr  😀 😀 😀 😀
Time of Death (Tom Thorne 13) by Mark Billingham  🙂 🙂 😐
Tombland (Matthew Shardlake 7) by CJ Sansom  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Traitor’s Storm (Kit Marlowe 6) by MJ Trow  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Treachery in Bordeaux (Winemaker Detective Series 1) by Alaux & Balen  😀 😀 😀 😀

Trent’s Last Case by EC Bentley  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware  🙂 🙂 🙂
Twisted by Steve Cavanagh  😀 😀 😀 😀
Two-Way Murder by ECR Lorac  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

U

Under a Silent Moon by Elizabeth Haynes 😀 😀 😀 😀
Under World (Dalziel and Pascoe 10) by Reginald Hill  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Undesired by Yrsa Sigurdardóttir  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Unhallowed Ground by Gillian White  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Unplayable Lie (Josh Griffin 1) by Caleigh O’Shea  😀 😀 😀 😀
Until You’re Mine (DI Lorraine Fisher 1) by Samantha Hayes  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

V

The Valley of Fear by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Vanishing Box (Stephens and Mephisto 4) by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Vanishing Lord (PorterGirl 2) by Lucy Brazier  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Verdict of Twelve by Raymond Postgate  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Vertigo by Boileau-Narcejac  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Villain by Shuichi Yoshida  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Villa of Mysteries (Nic Costa 2) by David Hewson 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Voices Beyond (Öland Quartet 4) by Johan Theorin  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

W

Want You Dead (Roy Grace 10) by Peter James  🙂 🙂 🙂
Watching You (Joe O’Loughlin 6) by Michael Robotham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Weekend at Thrackley  🙂 🙂 😐
The Weight of Blood by Laura McHugh  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Westwind by Ian Rankin  🙂 🙂 😐
What Lies Within by Tom Vowler  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Wheel Spins by Ethel Lina White  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Where the Dead Men Go (Conway Trilogy 2) by Liam McIlvanney  😀 😀 😀 😀
While the Light Lasts by Agatha Christie  🙂 🙂 🙂
White Bodies by Jane Robins  😀 😀 😀 😀
The White Cottage Mystery by Margery Allingham  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Wicked Autumn (Max Tudor 1) by GM Malliet  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Wicked Boy by Kate Summerscale  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Widow  😀 😀 🙂

The Winter Foundlings (Alice Quentin 3) by Kate Rhodes  🙂 🙂 😐
Witness the Night by Kishwar Desai  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Wolf (Jack Caffrey 7) by Mo Hayder  😦 😦
The Woman in Blue (Ruth Galloway 8) by Elly Griffiths  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz  🙂 🙂 🙂

X

Y

You by Zoran Drvenkar  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
You Have to Tell by J Sanclemente  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Z

The Zig Zag Girl (Stephens and Mephisto 1) by Elly Griffiths  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

0-9

4.50 from Paddington by Agatha Christie  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The 12:30 from Croydon by Freeman Wills Crofts  😀 😀 😀 😀 :

Crime and Thriller Fiction listed by Author

Abbott, Megan

The End of Everything  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Dare Me  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Fever  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Give Me Your Hand  😀 😀 😀 😀
You Will Know Me  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Ace, Cathy

The Case of the Dotty Dowager  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Adler-Olsen, Jussi

Redemption (Department Q 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Purity of Vengeance (Department Q 4)  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐

Airth, Rennie

The Dead of Winter (John Madden 3) 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Reckoning (John Madden 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Death of Kings (John Madden 5)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Alaux, Jean-Pierre and Balen, Noël

Treachery in Bordeaux (The Winemaker Detective Series 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Grand Cru Heist (The Winemaker Detective Series 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Allingham, Margery

The Case of the Late Pig  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Crime at Black Dudley (Albert Campion 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The White Cottage Mystery  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Allott, Susan

The Silence  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Armstrong, Charlotte

The Case of the Weird Sisters  😦 😦

Asimov, Isaac

The Caves of Steel (Elijah Bailey 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Aspe, Pieter

The Square of Revenge (Pieter Van In)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Midas Murders (Pieter Van In 2) 😦

Atkinson, Kate

Case Histories (Jackson Brodie 1)  😐 😐
One Good Turn (Jackson Brodie 2)  😦

Bagchi, David

The Mystery of Briony Lodge  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bagley, Desmond

Domino Island  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bain, Donald

Murder, She Wrote: Design for Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀

Ball, John

In the Heat of the Night  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bauer, Belinda

The Beautiful Dead  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Facts of Life and Death
😀 😀 😀 😀
Rubbernecker  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Shut Eye 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Snap  🙂 🙂 🙂

Barclay, Linwood

Broken Promise  😐 😐

Barton, Fiona

The Widow  😀 😀 🙂

Beaton, MC

Agatha Raisin and the Love from Hell read by Penelope Keith  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Bell, Josephine

The Port of London Murders  😀 😀 😀 😀

Bellairs, George

The Body in the Dumb River  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Dead Shall be Raised  😀 😀 😀 😀

The Murder of a Quack  😀 😀 😀 😀
Surfeit of Suspects  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Bennett, Margot

The Man Who Didn’t Fly  😀 😀 😀 😀

Benson, EF

The Blotting Book  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bentley, EC

Trent’s Last Case  😀 😀 😀 😀

Berkeley, Anthony

The Mystery of Horne’s Copse  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Poisoned Chocolates Case  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Razor Edge  😀 😀 🙂

Billingham, Mark

Time of Death (Tom Thorne 13)  🙂 🙂 😐

Black, Benjamin

Even the Dead (Quirke 7)  🙂 🙂 😐

Blake, Victoria

Mrs Maybrick (Crime Archive Series)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bloch, Robert

Psycho  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Boileau-Narcejac

She Who Was No More  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Vertigo  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bolton, Sharon (previously SJ)

Now You See Me (Lacey Flint 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Dead Scared (Lacey Flint 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

If Snow Hadn’t Fallen (Lacey Flint Novella)
  😀 😀 😀 😀
Like This, For Ever (Lacey Flint 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

A Dark and Twisted Tide (Lacey Flint 4)
  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Here Be Dragons: A Short Story (Lacey Flint)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Daisy in Chains  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Dead Woman Walking  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Little Black Lies 🙂 🙂 😐
The Pact  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Borges, Jorge Luis

Six Problems for Don Isidro Parodi  😦

Bradley, Rebecca

Shallow Waters (DI Hannah Robbins 1)  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Bramah, Ernest

The Bravo of London (Max Carrados)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Brand, Christianna

Green for Danger  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Brazier, Lucy

Secret Diary of PorterGirl (PorterGirl 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Vanishing Lord (PorterGirl 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Sinister Dexter (PorterGirl 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Brett, Simon

The Strangling on the Stage (Fethering Mysteries)  😦 😦

Brookmyre, Chris

Black Widow (Jack Parlabane 7)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Brown, Cindy

Oliver Twisted (Ivy Meadows 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Buchan, John

The Thirty-Nine Steps  😀 😀 😀 😀

Bude, John

The Cheltenham Square Murder  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐
Death in White Pyjamas  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death Knows No Calendar  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death Makes a Prophet  🙂 🙂 🙂
Death on the Riviera  😀 😀 😀 😀

The Sussex Downs Muder  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Burnet, Graeme Macrae

The Disappearance of Adèle Bedeau (Inspector Gorski 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Accident on the A35 (Inspector Gorski 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
His Bloody Project  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Burton, Miles

The Secret of High Eldersham  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Bush, Christopher

The Hampstead Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Cain, James M

The Postman Always Rings Twice  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Capote, Truman

In Cold Blood  😀 😀 😀 😀

Carlsson, Christoffer

The Invisible Man from Salem (Leo Junker 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Carnac, Carol

Crossed Skis  😀 😀 😀 😀

Carr, John Dickson

Castle Skull  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Corpse in the Waxworks  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
It Walks By Night  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Lost Gallows  😀 😀 😀 😀
Till Death Do Us Part (Gideon Fell 15)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Carrère, Emmanuel

The Adversary  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Casey, Donis

The Old Buzzard Had It Coming  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Casey, Jane

Left for Dead (A Maeve Kerrigan Prequel)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Burning (Maeve Kerrigan 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Reckoning (Maeve Kerrigan 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Last Girl (Maeve Kerrigan 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Stranger You Know (Maeve Kerrigan 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Kill (Maeve Kerrigan 5)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

After the Fire (Maeve Kerrigan 6)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Let the Dead Speak (Maeve Kerrigan 7)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Cruel Acts (Maeve Kerrigan 8)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Silent Kill (Maeve Kerrigan 8.5)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Cutting Place (Maeve Kerrigan 9)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
How to Fall (Jess Tennant 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Bet Your Life (Jess Tennant 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Killing Kind (standalone thriller)  🙂 🙂 🙂

Catton, Eleanor

The Luminaries  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Cavanagh, Steve

The Defence  😀 😀 😀 😀
Twisted  😀 😀 😀 😀

Cep, Casey

Furious Hours  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Chandler, Raymond

The Long Goodbye  😐 😐

Charlton, Karen

The Sans Pareil Mystery  🙂 😐

Chesterton, GK

The Hammer of God  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Innocence of Father Brown 😦

Childers, Erskine

The Riddle of the Sands  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Christie, Agatha

4.50 from Paddington  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Caribbean Mystery (Miss Marple) read by Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Murder is Announced  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The ABC Murders read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Affair at the Bungalow (Miss Marple short story)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Fairy in the Flat/A Pot of Tea (Tommy & Tuppence short stories)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
And Then There Were None read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Appointment with Death (Poirot) read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Clocks (Poirot) read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Disappearance of Mr Davenheim (Poirot short story)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Evil Under the Sun (Poirot)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side read by Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Moving Finger read by Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Mrs McGinty’s Dead read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Murder at the Vicarage (Miss Marple) read by Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder on the Orient Express read by David Suchet  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder, She Said: The Quotable Miss Marple  😀 😀 😀
The Mysterious Affair at Styles (Poirot)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
One, Two, Buckle My Shoe (Poirot) read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Peril at End House (Poirot) read by Hugh Fraser  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Secret Adversary (Tommy and Tuppence 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Thirteen Problems (Miss Marple) read by Joan Hickson  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
While the Light Lasts  🙂 🙂 🙂

Clark-Platts, Alice

Bitter Fruits (DI Erica Martin 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Cleary, Jon

The Golden Sabre  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Cleeves, Ann

The Crow Trap (Vera Stanhope 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Long Call (Two Rivers 1)  😦

Raven Black (Shetland 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Coben, Harlan

The Stranger  😀 😀 😀 😀
Six Years  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Cohen, Tammy

Dying for Christmas  😀 😀 😀 😀
First One Missing  🙂 🙂 😐

Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur

A Study in Scarlet 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Hound of the Baskervilles read by Derek Jacobi 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Sign of the Four  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Valley of Fear read by Stephen Fry  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes read by Derek Jacobi  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Return of Sherlock Holmes read by Derek Jacobi  😀 😀 😀 😀
Sherlock Holmes: The Dark Mysteries  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection read by Stephen Fry  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sherlock Holmes: Further Collection – BBC Audio  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Adventure of the Dancing Men  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Mystery of Cloomber  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Conyngham, Lexie

Death in a Scarlet Gown (Murray of Letho 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Knowledge of Sins Past (Murray of Letho 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Fellowship with Demons (Murray of Letho 5)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Tender Herb (Murray of Letho 6)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Cook, Kenneth

Fear is the Rider  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Cooper, Lydia

My Second Death  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Crispin, Edmund

The Moving Toyshop (Gervase Fen 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Crofts, Freeman Wills

The 12:30 from Croydon  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Cask  😦
Inspector French and the Crime at Guildford  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Inspector French and the Mystery on Southampton Water  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Inspector French: Sudden Death  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Dahl, Arne

The Blinded Man (Intercrime 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Bad Blood (Intercrime 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Davies, Abby

Mother Loves Me  😀 😀 😀 😀

Davies, Martin

Mrs Hudson and the Malabar Rose (Mrs Hudson 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Daws, Robert

The Rock (Sullivan and Broderick 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Poisoned Rock (Sullivan and Broderick 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

De Angelis, Augusto

The Murdered Banker  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Deaver, Jeffery

The Never Game (Colter Shaw 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Goodbye Man (Colter Shaw 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Final Twist (Colter Shaw 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Desai, Kishwar

Witness the Night  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Dexter, Colin

Morse’s Greatest Mystery  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Douglas-Home, Mark

The Malice of Waves (Cal McGill 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Drvenkar, Zoran

You  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Dugdall, Ruth

Humber Boy B  😀 😀 😀 😀

Dunmore, Helen

Exposure 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Dunn, Carola

Death at Wentwater Court (Daisy Dalrymple 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Durbridge, Francis

A Case for Paul Temple – BBC Audio dramatisation  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Edwards, Martin

A Surprise for Christmas (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Capital Crimes: London Mysteries (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Continental Crimes (editor)  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Christmas Card Crime and Other Stories (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Crimson Snow: Winter Mysteries (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Deep Waters (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Foreign Bodies (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Golden Age of Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Long Arm of the Law (editor)  😀 😀 😀
The Measure of Malice (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Miraculous Mysteries (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder at the Manor (editor)  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Resorting to Murder: Holiday Mysteries (editor) 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Settling Scores (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Dungeon House  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Ell, Gordon

The Ice Shroud  😀 😀 😀 😀

Ellory, RJ

A Dark and Broken Heart  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Devil and the River  🙂 🙂 🙂

Three Bullets  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Falkirk, Richard

The Chill Factor  😀 😀 😀 😀

Farjeon, J Jefferson

Thirteen Guests  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Faye, Lyndsay

Jane Steele  😦

Ferencik, Erica

The River at Night  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Ferris, Gordon

Bitter Water (Douglas Brodie 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Pilgrim Soul (Douglas Brodie 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Gallowglass (Douglas Brodie 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Money Tree  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Fisher, Rudolph

The Conjure-Man Dies  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Fitzek, Sebastian

The Child (Audible Studios Dramatisation)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Amok (Audible Studios Dramatisation)  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Flanery, Patrick

I Am No One  😀 😀 😀 😀
Fallen Land  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Fletcher, JS

The Middle Temple Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Foley, Lucy

The Guest List  🙂 🙂 🙂

Forester, CS

Payment Deferred  🙂 🙂 🙂

Fowler, Christopher

The Invisible Code (Bryant & May 10)  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐

Fox, Margalit

Conan Doyle for the Defence  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Frazier, Charles

Nightwoods  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Freeman R Austin

The Case of Oscar Brodski  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Eye of Osiris  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

French, Paul

Midnight in Peking  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

French, Tana

In the Woods (Dublin Murder Squad 1)  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Frost, Abbie

The Guesthouse  😀 😀 😀 😀

Fuller, Claire

Bitter Orange  🙂 🙂 🙂

Galbraith, Robert

The Cuckoo’s Calling  😀 😀 😀 😀

Gardiner, Meg

The Nightmare Thief 🙂 🙂 🙂

Garfield, Leon

Smith  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Garnier, Pascal

The A26  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Moon in a Dead Eye  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Gaspard, John

The Ambitious Card (Eli Marks 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Bullet Catch (Eli Marks 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Invisible Assistant (An Eli Marks Short Story)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Miser’s Dream (Eli Marks 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Linking Rings (Eli Marks 4)  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Gilbert, Anthony

Death in Fancy Dress  🙂 🙂 🙂

Gilbert, Michael

Death In Captivity  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Smallbone Deceased (Inspector Hazlerigg 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Death Has Deep Roots (Inspector Hazlerigg 5)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Gilbert, Paul D

The Annals of Sherlock Holmes  😦 😦

Grabenstein, Chris

Free Fall (John Ceepak Mysteries 8)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Grann, David

Killers of the Flower Moon  😀 😀 😀 😀

Gribble, Leonard

The Arsenal Stadium Mystery  😀 😀 😀 😀

Griffiths, Elly

The Janus Stone (Ruth Galloway 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀
A Dying Fall (Ruth Galloway 5)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Outcast Dead (Ruth Galloway 6)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Ghost Fields (Ruth Galloway 7)  🙂 🙂 😐

The Woman in Blue (Ruth Galloway 8)  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Zig Zag Girl (Stephens and Mephisto 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Smoke and Mirrors (Stephens and Mephisto 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Blood Card (Stephens and Mephisto 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Vanishing Box (Stephens and Mephisto 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Now You See Them (Stephens and Mephisto 5)  😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Stranger Diaries  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Grisham, John

A Time to Kill  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sycamore Row  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Calico Joe  🙂 🙂 😐
The Litigators  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Gusick, Gary

The Last Clinic  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Haggard, H Rider

King Solomon’s Mines  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Hammett, Dashiell

Arson Plus (The Continental Op)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Dain Curse (The Continental Op)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Maltese Falcon (Sam Spade)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Hannah, Sophie

The Monogram Murders (Hercule Poirot 1)  😦

Harper, Jane

The Dry (Aaron Falk 1) read by Stephen Shanahan  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Force of Nature (Aaron Falk 2) 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Lost Man  🙂 🙂 🙂
The Survivors  😀 😀 😀 😀

Harris, Joanne

Different Class  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Hayder, Mo

Wolf (Jack Caffrey 7)  😦 😦

Hayes, Samantha

Until You’re Mine (DI Lorraine Fisher 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Before You Die (DI Lorraine Fisher 2)  😦 😦

Haynes, Elizabeth

Under a Silent Moon 😀 😀 😀 😀

Helton, Peter

Indelible (A Chris Honeysett Mystery)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
A Good Way to Go  😀 😀 😀 😀

Henderson, Donald

A Voice Like Velvet  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Hewson, David

A Season for the Dead (Nic Costa 1) 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
The Villa of Mysteries (Nic Costa 2)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Highsmith, Patricia

Strangers on a Train  😀 😀 😀 😀

Hill, Reginald

A Clubbable Woman (Dalziel and Pascoe 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
An Advancement of Learning (Dalziel and Pascoe 2)
  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Ruling Passion (Dalziel and Pascoe 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
An April Shroud (Dalziel and Pascoe 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Pinch of Snuff (Dalziel and Pascoe 5)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
A Killing Kindness (Dalziel and Pascoe 6)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Deadheads (Dalziel and Pascoe 7)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Exit Lines (Dalziel and Pascoe 8)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Child’s Play (Dalziel and Pascoe 9)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Under World (Dalziel and Pascoe 10)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Bones and Silence (Dalziel and Pascoe 11  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Last National Service Man (Dalziel and Pascoe short story) 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Hogan, Phil

A Pleasure and a Calling  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Holt, Anne

Blessed Are Those Who Thirst (Hanne Wilhelmsen 2)  😀 😀 😀 🙂
Death of the Demon (Hanne Wilhelmsen 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Horowitz, Anthony

The House of Silk 😀 😀 😀 😀
Magpie Murders  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Moriarty  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Word is Murder  🙂 🙂 🙂

Horst, Jørn Lier

The Cabin (Cold Case Quartet 2)  😐 😐
The Katharina Code (William Wisting 12)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Hull, Richard

Excellent Intentions  😀 😀 🙂
The Murder of My Aunt  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Iles, Francis

Malice Aforethought  🙂 🙂 🙂

Innes, Michael

Death at the President’s Lodging (Inspector Appleby 1)  😦

Ison, Graham

Hardcastle’s Quartet  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

James, PD

The Mistletoe Murders and Other Stories  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

James, Peter

Want You Dead (Roy Grace 10)  🙂 🙂 🙂

Jónasson, Ragnar

Snowblind (Dark Iceland 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Nightblind (Dark Iceland 5) 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Jones, Susanna

The Earthquake Bird  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Kelly, Erin

He Said/She Said  🙂 🙂 😐
The Ties that Bind  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Kelly, Mary

The Christmas Egg  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Spoilt Kill  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Kidd, Jess

Himself  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Kim, Un-Su

The Plotters  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Kinberg, Margot

A Matter of Motive (Patricia Stanley 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Downfall (Joel Williams 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Past Tense (Joel Williams 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀

King, C. Daly

The Curious Mr Tarrant  😐 😐

King, Laurie R

The Bones of Paris (Harris Stuyvesant 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

King, Laurie R and Klinger, Leslie S, eds.

Echoes of Sherlock Holmes  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Koch, Herman

The Dinner  😀 😀 😀 😀
Summer House with Swimming Pool  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Komar, Debra

Black River Road  😀 😀 😀 😀

Läckberg, Camilla

The Ice Princess (Patrik Hedström and Erica Falck 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Stranger
(Patrik Hedström and Erica Falck 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Lane, Harriet

Her 😐 😐 😐

le Carré, John

The Spy Who Came In from the Cold  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Leon, Donna

By Its Cover (Commissario Brunetti 23)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Falling in Love (Commissario Brunetti 24)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Leroux, Gaston

The Mystery of the Yellow Room  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Locke, Attica

Bluebird, Bluebird  😀 😀 😀 😀

Loder, Vernon

The Shop Window Murders  😀 😀 🙂

Lombard, Nap

Murder’s A Swine  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Lorac, ECR

Bats in the Belfry  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Checkmate to Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Fell Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Fire in the Thatch  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder by Matchlight  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Murder in the Mill-Race  😀 😀 😀 😀
Two-Way Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Lowndes, Marie Belloc

The Chianti Flask  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Lodger  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

McBain, Ed

Cop Hater (87th Precinct 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Mugger (87th Precinct 2)  🙂 🙂 🙂

McBeth, Colette

The Life I Left Behind  😐 😐

MacBride, Stuart

All That’s Dead (Logan McRae 12)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Close to the Bone (Logan McRae 8)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

McCrery, Nigel

Silent Witnesses: A History of Forensic Science  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

McDermid, Val

A Darker Domain (Karen Pirie 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Broken Ground (Karen Pirie 5)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Out of Bounds (Karen Pirie 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Skeleton Road (Karen Pirie 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀

McHugh, Laura

The Weight of Blood  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

McIlvanney, Liam

Where the Dead Men Go (Conway Trilogy 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀

McIlvanney, William

Laidlaw (Laidlaw Trilogy 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Papers of Tony Veitch (Laidlaw Trilogy 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Strange Loyalties (Laidlaw Trilogy 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

McKinty, Adrian

The Cold, Cold Ground (Sean Duffy 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂
I Hear the Sirens in the Street (Sean Duffy 2)  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐

MacLean, Shona (previously SG)

The Redemption of Alexander Seaton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Seeker  🙂 🙂

Maitland, Iain

Sweet William  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Malliet, GM

Wicked Autumn (Max Tudor 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂

Mangan, Christine

Tangerine  😦

Mark, David

Original Skin (Aector McAvoy 2)  😦

Marklund, Liza

The Long Shadow (Annika Bengtzon 8)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Mason, AEW

At the Villa Rose  😀 😀 😀 😀

May, Peter

The Blackhouse (Lewis Trilogy 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Lewis Man (Lewis Trilogy 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Chessmen (Lewis Trilogy 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Dry Bones (Enzo Files 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Cast Iron (Enzo Files 6)  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Ghost Marriage (China Thrillers)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Coffin Road 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Entry Island  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
I’ll Keep You Safe  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Man With No Face  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Runaway 😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Mayhew, Margaret

The Seventh Link  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Mazzola, Anna

The Story Keeper  😀 😀 😀 😀

Medawar, Tony

Bodies from the Library 2 (editor)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bodies from the Library 3 (editor)  🙂 🙂 🙂

Melville, Alan

Quick Curtain  😦 😦
Weekend at Thrackley  🙂 🙂 😐

Meredith, Anne

Portrait of a Murderer  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Messent, Peter

The Crime Fiction Handbook  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Millar, Margaret

The Listening Walls  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Milne, AA

The Red House Mystery  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Mina, Denise

Conviction  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Less Dead  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

The Long Drop  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Minato, Kanae

Confessions  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Penance  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Molay, Frédérique

The 7th Woman (Paris Homicide 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Moriarty, Liane

Little Lies  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Motion, Andrew

Silver: Return to Treasure Island 😀 😀 😀 😀
The New World  😀 😀 😀 😀

Mukherjee, Abir

A Rising Man (Sam Wyndham 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
A Necessary Evil (Sam Wyndham 2) 😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Smoke and Ashes (Sam Wyndham 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Neary, Annemarie

Siren  🙂 🙂 😐

Nesbo, Jo

The Son  🙂 🙂 🙂

Norman, Charity

The Secrets of Strangers  😀 😀 😀 😀

North, Gil

The Methods of Sergeant Cluff  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sergeant Cluff Stands Firm
  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Oates, Joyce Carol

Jack of Spades  😐 😐

O’Connell, Carol

The Chalk Girl (Mallory 10)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Judas Child  😀 😀 😀

Orczy, Baroness

The Case of Miss Elliot  😀 😀 😀 🙂

O’Shea, Caleigh

Unplayable Lie  😀 😀 😀 😀

Oxenham, John

A Mystery of the Underground  😀 😀 😀 😀

Parris, SJ

Execution (Giordano Bruno 6)  😐 😐

Paull, Laline

The Ice  🙂 🙂

Persson, Leif GW

Falling Freely, As If In A Dream  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Phillips, Joanne

Murder at the Maples (Flora Lively 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Phillpotts, Eden

The Red Redmaynes  😀 😀 😀 😀

Poe, Edgar Allan

The Purloined Letter  😦 😦

Ponsor, Michael

The Hanging Judge  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Post, Nina

Danger in Cat World  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Postgate, Raymond

Somebody at the Door  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Verdict of Twelve  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Proctor, Elaine

The Savage Hour  😀 😀 😀 😀

Qiu, Xiaolong

Death of a Red Heroine (Inspector Chen 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Rankin, Ian

Saints of the Shadow Bible (Rebus 19)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Even Dogs in the Wild (Rebus 20)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Rather Be the Devil (Rebus 21)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Beat Goes On: The Complete Rebus Stories  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
OxCrimes (introduction to anthology)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Westwind  🙂 🙂 😐

Rash, Ron

Serena  😦 😦

Rhodes, Kate

The Winter Foundlings (Alice Quentin 3)  🙂 🙂 😐

Rhys, Rachel

A Dangerous Crossing  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Fatal Inheritance  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Rindell, Suzanne

The Other Typist  😀 😀 😀 😀

Robertson, Craig

The Last Refuge 🙂 🙂 🙂

Robins, Jane

The Curious Habits of Doctor Adams: A 1950s Murder Mystery  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Magnificent Spilsbury and the Case of the Brides in the Bath  😀 😀 😀 🙂
White Bodies  😀 😀 😀 😀

Robotham, Michael

The Suspect (Joe O’Loughlin 1)  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Lost (Joe O’Loughlin 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Night Ferry
  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Watching You (Joe O’Loughlin 6)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Close Your Eyes (Joe O’Loughlin)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Life or Death  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Rolls, Anthony

Family Matters  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Scarweather  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Runcie, James

Sydney Chambers and the Shadow of Death  😀 😀 😀 😀

Rutland, Harriet

Knock, Murderer, Knock  😀 😀 😀 😀

Sanclemente, J

You Have to Tell  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Sandrolini, John

One for Our Baby 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Sansom, CJ

Dissolution (Matthew Shardlake 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Dark Fire (Matthew Shardlake 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake 3)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Revelation (Matthew Shardlake 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Lamentation (Matthew Shardlake 6)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Tombland (Matthew Shardlake 7)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Dominion  😀 😀 😀 😀

Savage, Angela

Behind the Night Bazaar (Jayne Keeney 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Sayers, Dorothy L

Clouds of Witness (Lord Peter Wimsey 2)  😐 😐
The Fantastic Horror of the Cat in the Bag  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Schmidt, Sarah

See What I Have Done  😦

Shaw, William

Deadland (DS Alex Cupidi 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Sherez, Stav

A Dark Redemption (Carrigan and Miller 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Eleven Days (Carrigan and Miller 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Sigurdardóttir, Yrsa

The Legacy (Children’s House 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Someone to Watch Over Me  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Undesired  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Silver, Elizabeth L

The Execution of Noa P. Singleton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Simenon, Georges

Pietr the Latvian (Maigret 1) 🙂 🙂 🙂
Cécile is Dead (Maigret 20)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret Takes a Room (Maigret 37)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret and the Tall Woman (Maigret 38)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret’s Revolver (Maigret 40)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
Maigret and the Reluctant Witnesses (Maigret 53)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Maigret and the Ghost (Maigret 62)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Man from London  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Sims, George

The End of the Web  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Sims, Michael

The Dead Witness  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Skelton, Douglas

Open Wounds (Davie McCall 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Slaughter, Karin

False Witness 😦

Smith, Dwayne Alexander

Forty Acres  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Spielberg, Cristoph

He Who Dies Last  🙂 🙂 🙂

Spillane, Mickey

I, the Jury  😀 😀 😀 😀

Spjut, Stefan

The Shapeshifters  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Sprigg, Christopher St. John

Death of an Airman  😀 😀 😀 😀

Stapleton, Susannah

The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective by Susannah Stapleton  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Stashower, Daniel

The Hour of Peril  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Starrett, Vincent

The Taggart Assignment  😀 😀 😀 😀

Steadman, Bernie

Death on Dartmoor (Dan Hellier 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Steadman, Catherine

The Disappearing Act  😀 😀 😀 😀

Stone, Lisa

Taken  😀 😀 😀 😀

Stout, Rex

Murder Is No Joke  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Stratmann, Linda

The Secret Poisoner  😀 😀 😀 🙂

Summerscale, Kate

The Wicked Boy  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Sundstøl, Vidar

The Land of Dreams (Minnesota Trilogy 1)  😦 😦

Symons, Julian

The Belting Inheritance  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Colour of Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Progress of a Crime  🙂 🙂 🙂

Teodorescu, Bogdan

Sword  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Tey, Josephine

The Franchise Affair  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Theorin, Johan

Echoes from the Dead (Öland Quartet 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂
The Voices Beyond (Öland Quartet 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Asylum 😀 😀 😀 😀

Toobin, Jeffrey

American Heiress: The Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Tremayne, Peter

The Spiteful Shadow  😀 😀 😀 😀

Trow, MJ

Crimson Rose (Kit Marlowe 5)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Traitor’s Storm (Kit Marlowe 6) 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Turow, Scott

Identical  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Testimony  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Unger, Lisa

In the Blood  🙂 🙂 🙂 😐

Van Ash, Cay

Ten Years Beyond Baker Street  😀 😀 😀 😀

Viner, PD

The Last Winter of Dani Lancing  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

von Schirach, Ferdinand

The Collini Case  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Girl Who Wasn’t There  😐 😐

Vowler, Tom

What Lies Within  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
That Dark Remembered Day  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Waites, Martyn

The Old Religion  🙂 🙂 🙂

Walker, Walter

Crime of Privilege  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Wallace, Edgar

The Four Just Men  😀 😀 😀 😀
The Stealer of Marble  😀 😀 😀 😀

Walpole, Hugh

The Killer and the Slain  😦

Ware, Ruth

The Death of Mrs Westaway  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
The Turn of the Key  🙂 🙂 🙂

Watson, Colin

Blue Murder (Flaxborough Chronicles 10)  😀 😀 😀 😀
Broomsticks Over Flaxborough (Flaxborough Chronicles 7)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Bump in the Night (Flaxborough Chronicles 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀
Lonelyheart 4122 (Flaxborough Chronicles 4)  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Watson, SJ

Second Life  🙂 🙂 😐

Watt, Douglas

Testament of a Witch (John Mackenzie 2)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Weir, Andy

The Martian  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Wells, Carolyn

Murder in the Bookshop  🙂 🙂 🙂

Wentworth, Patricia

The Black Cabinet  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

White, Ethel Lina

Some Must Watch  🙂 🙂 😐
The Wheel Spins  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

White, Gillian

Unhallowed Ground 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Copycat 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

The Beggar Bride  😀 😀 😀 😀

The Sleeper  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

White, TH

Darkness at Pemberley  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Whitechurch, Victor L

Crime at Diana’s Pool  🙂 🙂 🙂

Whitehouse, Lucie

Critical Incidents (Robin Lyons 1)  😀 😀 😀 😀

Wilkinson, Ellen

The Division Bell Mystery  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Wojtas, Olga

Miss Blaine’s Prefect and the Golden Samovar 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Worsley, Lucy

A Very British Murder  😀 😀 😀 😀

Wynne, Anthony

Murder of a Lady: A Scottish Mystery  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Yokomizo, Seishi

The Honjin Murders  😀 😀 😀 😀

Yoshida, Shuichi

Villain  😀 😀 😀 😀
Parade  😀 😀 😀 😀 🙂

Zan, Koethi

The Follower  🙂 🙂 😐
The Never List  😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

Zouroudi, Anne

The Messenger of Athens  😦