TBR Thursday 16…

Episode 16

 

Hovering at 100, and determined to get below it, so adding nothing today. Instead, here’s a few of the existing TBR list that I hope to be reading soon…

All courtesy of NetGalley:

the martian

I’ve been seeing enthusiastic reviews of this all over the place – not my usual kind of thing, but looks good…

Apollo 13 meets Cast Away in this grippingly detailed, brilliantly ingenious man-vs-nature survival thriller, set on the surface of Mars. Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first men to walk on the surface of Mars. Now, he’s sure he’ll be the first man to die there. It started with the dust storm that holed his suit and nearly killed him, and that forced his crew to leave him behind, sure he was already dead. Now he’s stranded millions of miles from the nearest human being, with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive–and even if he could get word out, his food would be gone years before a rescue mission could arrive. But Mark isn’t ready to give up yet.”

*****

thirteenAnd by coincidence, next up is the real behind the scenes story of Apollo 13…

On the evening of April 13, 1970, the three astronauts aboard Apollo 13 were just hours from the third lunar landing in history. But as they soared through space, two hundred thousand miles from earth, an explosion badly damaged their spacecraft. With compromised engines and failing life-support systems, the crew was in incomparably grave danger. Faced with below-freezing temperatures, a seriously ill crew member, and a dwindling water supply, a safe return seemed unlikely. Thirteen is the shocking, miraculous, and entirely true story of how the astronauts and ground crew guided Apollo 13 to a safe landing on earth. Expanding on dispatches written for the New Yorker, Henry S. F. Cooper Jr. brings readers unparalleled detail on the moment-by-moment developments of one of NASA’s most dramatic missions.

*****

the weight of bloodCan’t remember why I selected this one (probably that TBR gnome at work again) but it sounds good…

The town of Henbane sits deep in the Ozark Mountains. Folks there still whisper about Lucy Dane’s mother, a bewitching stranger who appeared long enough to marry Carl Dane and then vanished when Lucy was just a child. Now on the brink of adulthood, Lucy experiences another loss when her friend Cheri disappears and is then found murdered, her body placed on display for all to see. Lucy’s family has deep roots in the Ozarks, part of a community that is fiercely protective of its own. Yet despite her close ties to the land, and despite her family’s influence, Lucy—darkly beautiful as her mother was—is always thought of by those around her as her mother’s daughter. When Cheri disappears, Lucy is haunted by the two lost girls—the mother she never knew and the friend she couldn’t save—and sets out with the help of a local boy, Daniel, to uncover the mystery behind Cheri’s death.

*****

All blurbs are taken from NetGalley or Goodreads.

Any of these appeal to you? What books are you looking foward to?

44 thoughts on “TBR Thursday 16…

  1. FictionFan – Oh, these all look enticing. I can see why they’re appealing to you, and I give you all credit for not adding to the TBR list. You have more will power (or is it ‘won’t power?’) than I do!

    • I’m absolutely determined to get the list under control! 😉 I really want to make some room for re-reads this year – I don’t think I managed to visit any old favourites last year.

    • Oh good! Glad you’re enjoying NN and I think you’ll love Revolutionary Road if you decide to go for it. I don’t read nearly enough poetry – I’m always full of good intentions about it, but it rarely comes to anything…

  2. I shall definitely give the Apollo 13 a look. I remember watching it come down and waiting for what seemed like an eternity while they were out of contact on re-entry. I still think that the greatest achievement of that programme was not getting man on the moon but finding a way to bring Apollo 13 home safely.

    • The odd thing is I don’t really remember it, though I watched the moon landings avidly. I only really know about it from the film. I can’t think that my parents would have deliberately tried to stop me seeing the news – they never really did things like that. I think I must just have been involved in other things and not paying attention. But I agree – it’s an amazing story, and I’m looking forward to the book to find out more about what exactly happened…

  3. These all sound good. One of my favourite space-programme books is Gene Kranz’s “Failure is not an option” – it will be interesting to get another take on Apollo 13.

    • I haven’t read that one – this one is a republication, I think, that originally came out quite a long time ago. The publishers kind of pushed it at me – so I’m hoping that’s not a bad sign…

  4. The Apollo book sounds gripping. As an aside, we raised Black Angus cattle on our farm when I was growing up. One year, our father decided to breed an Angus with a Charolais. On the night that Apollo 11 astronauts walked on the moon, the angus gave birth to a pure white calf. We named him Apollo.

    • Yes, I hope it’s as good as it sounds, and it’ll go well with the Martian book…

      We were on holiday in Portobello that week (sounds exotic but it’s actually a wee place just outside Edinburgh) and all crowded round the tiny black and white TV in the boarding house to watch the landing. Brilliant! I really expected we’d all be having holidays on the moon by the time I grew up…

    • I was going to read it at the weekend but it looks like the publication date has been put back – March in the US but not till July in the UK. So I’ve put it back a couple of weeks…

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