Dominion by CJ Sansom

dominionWhat if?

🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

In a departure from his Shardlake series, Sansom has created here an alternative recent history – what if Britain had surrendered to Germany after Dunkirk? What if Nazi sympathisers were running the government? What if Churchill had never become Prime Minister and instead was leading a resistance movement? Sansom creates a world that is so similar to the real world and yet so different that I eventually found I was having to make an effort to remember what was reality and what was fiction.

The plot follows a group of members of the resistance as they try to protect a man who holds a secret that mustn’t fall into the hands of the Germans. We get to know each of the main characters well – Sansom gives us enough of their backstories to let us understand their motivations and each is, in his or her own way, easy to empathise with. Although he doesn’t shy away from describing the atrocities against the Jews and Russians, even the German characters come across as understandable and oddly sympathetic, however horrifying their thoughts and actions.

CJ Sansom (waterstones.com)
CJ Sansom
(waterstones.com)

As always, Sansom’s excellent descriptive writing creates a completely believable world and this is both a strength and a weakness of the book. I felt that sometimes he got so wrapped up in expanding on the world of his creation that he slowed the plot down to a level that prevented the tension from building quite as much as it should in what is fundamentally a thriller. I was also left a bit uncomfortable about the way he made some real-life right-wing politicians into Nazi sympathisers for the purposes of his plot, particularly some who in real life had served either in the forces or in Churchill’s government. Overall, though, I found this to be an interesting, cleverly constructed and well-written book that indeed left me wondering ‘what if?’. Recommended.

Amazon UK Link
Amazon US Link

2 thoughts on “Dominion by CJ Sansom

  1. ‘What if’ is always an interesting question on which to base a book. And speculative fiction can be innovative. I’m glad you found this enjoyable and I have to say I agree with you about Matthew Shardlake’s writing style. 🙂

    • It can be a difficult thing because often the ‘alternative’ bit comes over as incredible. But Sansom’s so skilled he makes it seem frighteningly believable. I’ve enjoyed all his books, but still prefer the Shardlake ones most of all. 🙂

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